Identifying Children at Risk for Language Impairment or Dyslexia With Group-Administered Measures Purpose The study aims to determine whether brief, group-administered screening measures can reliably identify second-grade children at risk for language impairment (LI) or dyslexia and to examine the degree to which parents of affected children were aware of their children's difficulties. Method Participants (N = 381) completed screening ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 20, 2017
Identifying Children at Risk for Language Impairment or Dyslexia With Group-Administered Measures
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Suzanne M. Adlof
    University of South Carolina, Columbia
  • Joanna Scoggins
    University of South Carolina, Columbia
  • Allison Brazendale
    University of South Carolina, Columbia
  • Spencer Babb
    University of South Carolina, Columbia
  • Yaacov Petscher
    Florida State University, Tallahassee
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Suzanne M. Adlof: sadlof@mailbox.sc.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Sean Redmond
    Editor-in-Chief: Sean Redmond×
  • Editor: Megan Dunn Davison
    Editor: Megan Dunn Davison×
Article Information
Development / School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Reading & Writing Disorders / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 20, 2017
Identifying Children at Risk for Language Impairment or Dyslexia With Group-Administered Measures
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2017, Vol. 60, 3507-3522. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-L-16-0473
History: Received December 29, 2016 , Revised May 12, 2017 , Accepted August 1, 2017
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2017, Vol. 60, 3507-3522. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-L-16-0473
History: Received December 29, 2016; Revised May 12, 2017; Accepted August 1, 2017

Purpose The study aims to determine whether brief, group-administered screening measures can reliably identify second-grade children at risk for language impairment (LI) or dyslexia and to examine the degree to which parents of affected children were aware of their children's difficulties.

Method Participants (N = 381) completed screening tasks and assessments of word reading, oral language, and nonverbal intelligence. Their parents completed questionnaires that inquired about reading and language development.

Results Despite considerable overlap in the children meeting criteria for LI and dyslexia, many children exhibited problems in only one domain. The combined screening tasks reliably identified children at risk for either LI or dyslexia (area under the curve = 0.842), but they were more accurate at identifying risk for dyslexia than LI. Parents of children with LI and/or dyslexia were frequently unaware of their children's difficulties. Parents of children with LI but good word reading skills were the least likely of all impairment groups to report concerns or prior receipt of speech, language, or reading services.

Conclusions Group-administered screens can identify children at risk of LI and/or dyslexia with good classification accuracy and in less time than individually administered measures. More research is needed to improve the identification of children with LI who display good word reading skills.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported, in part, by funding from the National Institutes of Health (R03DC013399) to the University of South Carolina (PI: Adlof). We thank the participants of this study and the teachers and schools who assisted us with screening and recruitment and provided space and time for assessment. We thank research assistants from the SCROLL Lab at the University of South Carolina for their help with data collection and processing, including Sheida Abdi, Pooja Adarkar, Ellen Ashley, Faith Baumann, Alex Cattano, Rebecca Duross, Madison Goehring, Amanda Harris, Katie Harrison, Alison Hendricks, Alyssa Ives, Hannah Kinkead, Pooja Malhorta, Sara Mallon, Elaine Miller, Hannah Patten, Caroline Smith, Sheneka White, and Kimberly Wood. We are also grateful to Alison Hendricks for comments on an earlier version of this manuscript.
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