The Effects of Palate Features and Glossectomy Surgery on /s/ Production Purpose The aims of this article were to determine the effects of hard palate morphology and glossectomy surgery on tongue position and shape during /s/ for patients with small tumors. The first expectation was that laminal /s/ would be more prevalent in patients, than apical, due to reduced tongue tip ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 20, 2017
The Effects of Palate Features and Glossectomy Surgery on /s/ Production
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Dana L. Grimm
    University of Maryland School of Dentistry, Baltimore
  • Maureen Stone
    University of Maryland School of Dentistry, Baltimore
  • Jonghye Woo
    Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston
  • Junghoon Lee
    Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
  • Jun-Hyuk Hwang
    University of Maryland School of Dentistry, Baltimore
  • Gary E. Bedrosian
    University of Maryland School of Dentistry, Baltimore
  • Jerry L. Prince
    Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Maureen Stone: mstone@umaryland.edu
  • Editor: Julie Liss
    Editor: Julie Liss×
  • Associate Editor: Nancy Solomon
    Associate Editor: Nancy Solomon×
Article Information
Healthcare Settings / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 20, 2017
The Effects of Palate Features and Glossectomy Surgery on /s/ Production
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2017, Vol. 60, 3417-3425. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-16-0425
History: Received November 16, 2016 , Revised May 3, 2017 , Accepted August 5, 2017
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2017, Vol. 60, 3417-3425. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-16-0425
History: Received November 16, 2016; Revised May 3, 2017; Accepted August 5, 2017

Purpose The aims of this article were to determine the effects of hard palate morphology and glossectomy surgery on tongue position and shape during /s/ for patients with small tumors. The first expectation was that laminal /s/ would be more prevalent in patients, than apical, due to reduced tongue tip control after surgery. The second was that patients would hold the tongue more anteriorly than controls to compensate for reduced tongue mass.

Method Three-dimensional tongue volumes were calculated from magnetic resonance imaging for the whole tongue and the portion anterior to the first molar during the /s/ in /əsuk/ for 21 controls and 14 patients. These volumes were used to calculate tongue anteriority and cross-sectional shape. Dental casts were used to measure palate perimeter, height, and width of the hard palate.

Results Palate height correlated with tongue height in controls (p < .05), but not patients. In patients, tongue anteriority correlated negatively with canine width and cross-sectional tongue shape (p < .05). Controls with a high palate favored laminal /s/. Patients preferred laminal /s/ regardless of palate height (p < .01).

Conclusions For controls, hard palate height affected tongue height; a higher palate yielded a higher tongue. For patients, hard palate width affected tongue width; a narrower palate yielded a more anterior tongue. Tongue shape was unaffected by any palate features. Preference for /s/ showed an interaction effect between subject and palate height. Controls with high palates preferred a laminal /s/. All patients preferred a laminal /s/; glossectomy surgery may reduce tongue tip control.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported in part by National Institutes of Health Grant R01CA133015 (PI M. Stone) and Grant R01DC014717 (PI Jerry L. Prince). The authors would like to thank Gary Bedrosian and Fangxu Xing for their contributions to this project.
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