Sentence-Level Movements in Parkinson's Disease: Loud, Clear, and Slow Speech Purpose To further understand the effect of Parkinson's disease (PD) on articulatory movements in speech and to expand our knowledge of therapeutic treatment strategies, this study examined movements of the jaw, tongue blade, and tongue dorsum during sentence production with respect to speech intelligibility and compared the effect of varying ... Research Article
Newly Published
Research Article  |   December 06, 2017
Sentence-Level Movements in Parkinson's Disease: Loud, Clear, and Slow Speech
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Elaine Kearney
    Department of Speech-Language Pathology, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, University Health Network, Ontario, Canada
  • Renuka Giles
    Department of Speech-Language Pathology, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, University Health Network, Ontario, Canada
  • Brandon Haworth
    Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, University Health Network, Ontario, Canada
    Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, York University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Petros Faloutsos
    Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, University Health Network, Ontario, Canada
    Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, York University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Melanie Baljko
    Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, University Health Network, Ontario, Canada
    Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, York University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Yana Yunusova
    Department of Speech-Language Pathology, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, University Health Network, Ontario, Canada
    Department of Biological Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Elaine Kearney: elaine.kearney@mail.utoronto.ca
  • Editor-in-Chief: Julie Liss
    Editor-in-Chief: Julie Liss×
  • Editor: Tanya Eadie
    Editor: Tanya Eadie×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Newly Published / Research Article
Research Article   |   December 06, 2017
Sentence-Level Movements in Parkinson's Disease: Loud, Clear, and Slow Speech
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-17-0075
History: Received February 23, 2017 , Revised May 24, 2017 , Accepted August 19, 2017
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-17-0075
History: Received February 23, 2017; Revised May 24, 2017; Accepted August 19, 2017

Purpose To further understand the effect of Parkinson's disease (PD) on articulatory movements in speech and to expand our knowledge of therapeutic treatment strategies, this study examined movements of the jaw, tongue blade, and tongue dorsum during sentence production with respect to speech intelligibility and compared the effect of varying speaking styles on these articulatory movements.

Method Twenty-one speakers with PD and 20 healthy controls produced 3 sentences under normal, loud, clear, and slow speaking conditions. Speech intelligibility was rated for each speaker. A 3-dimensional electromagnetic articulograph tracked movements of the articulators. Measures included articulatory working spaces, ranges along the first principal component, average speeds, and sentence durations.

Results Speakers with PD demonstrated significantly smaller jaw movements as well as shorter than normal sentence durations. Between-speaker variation in movement size of the jaw, tongue blade, and tongue dorsum was associated with speech intelligibility. Analysis of speaking conditions revealed similar patterns of change in movement measures across groups and articulators: larger than normal movement sizes and faster speeds for loud speech, increased movement sizes for clear speech, and larger than normal movement sizes and slower speeds for slow speech.

Conclusions Sentence-level measures of articulatory movements are sensitive to both disease-related changes in PD and speaking-style manipulations.

Acknowledgments
Portions of this study were presented at the 18th Biennial Conference on Motor Speech, Newport Beach, California, on March 2016. This research was supported by the Parkinson's Society of Canada Pilot Project Grant, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council Discovery Grant, and the Centre for Innovation in Information Visualization and Data-Driven Design. We are grateful to the participants and their families for taking part in this project. We also thank Madhura Kulkarni and Vincci Tau for their assistance with this project.
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