Magnitude of Neck-Surface Vibration as an Estimate of Subglottal Pressure During Modulations of Vocal Effort and Intensity in Healthy Speakers Purpose This study examined the relationship between the magnitude of neck-surface vibration (NSVMag; transduced with an accelerometer) and intraoral estimates of subglottal pressure (P′sg) during variations in vocal effort at 3 intensity levels. Method Twelve vocally healthy adults produced strings of /pɑ/ syllables in 3 vocal intensity conditions, ... Research Article
Newly Published
Research Article  |   December 04, 2017
Magnitude of Neck-Surface Vibration as an Estimate of Subglottal Pressure During Modulations of Vocal Effort and Intensity in Healthy Speakers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Victoria S. McKenna
    Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Boston University, MA
  • Andres F. Llico
    Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Boston University, MA
  • Daryush D. Mehta
    Center for Laryngeal Surgery and Voice Rehabilitation, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston
    Department of Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, MGH Institute of Health Professions, Charlestown, MA
  • Joseph S. Perkell
    Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Boston University, MA
  • Cara E. Stepp
    Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Boston University, MA
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, Boston University, MA
    Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Boston University School of Medicine, MA
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Victoria S. McKenna: vmckenna@bu.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Julie Liss
    Editor-in-Chief: Julie Liss×
  • Editor: Catriona Steele
    Editor: Catriona Steele×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Newly Published / Research Article
Research Article   |   December 04, 2017
Magnitude of Neck-Surface Vibration as an Estimate of Subglottal Pressure During Modulations of Vocal Effort and Intensity in Healthy Speakers
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-17-0180
History: Received May 16, 2017 , Revised August 2, 2017 , Accepted August 3, 2017
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-17-0180
History: Received May 16, 2017; Revised August 2, 2017; Accepted August 3, 2017

Purpose This study examined the relationship between the magnitude of neck-surface vibration (NSVMag; transduced with an accelerometer) and intraoral estimates of subglottal pressure (P′sg) during variations in vocal effort at 3 intensity levels.

Method Twelve vocally healthy adults produced strings of /pɑ/ syllables in 3 vocal intensity conditions, while increasing vocal effort during each condition. Measures were made of P′sg (estimated during stop-consonant closure), NSVMag (measured during the following vowel), sound pressure level, and respiratory kinematics. Mixed linear regression was used to analyze the relationship between NSVMag and P′sg with respect to total lung volume excursion, levels of lung volume initiation and termination, airflow, laryngeal resistance, and vocal efficiency across intensity conditions.

Results NSVMag was significantly related to P′sg (p < .001), and there was a significant, although small, interaction between NSVMag and intensity condition. Total lung excursion was the only additional variable contributing to predicting the NSVMag–P′sg relationship.

Conclusions NSVMag closely reflects P′sg during variations of vocal effort; however, the relationship changes across different intensities in some individuals. Future research should explore additional NSV-based measures (e.g., glottal airflow features) to improve estimation accuracy during voice production.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by National Institutes of Health Grants DC015570 (CES), DC015877 (DDM), and DC013017 (CAM) from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. Thanks to Defne Abur and Elizabeth Heller Murray for assistance with data acquisition.
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