Receptive Vocabulary, Cognitive Flexibility, and Inhibitory Control Differentially Predict Older and Younger Adults' Success Perceiving Speech by Talkers With Dysarthria Purpose Previous research has demonstrated equivocal findings related to the effect of listener age on intelligibility ratings of dysarthric speech. The aim of the present study was to investigate the mechanisms that support younger and older adults' perception of speech by talkers with dysarthria. Method Younger and older ... Research Article
Newly Published
Research Article  |   December 04, 2017
Receptive Vocabulary, Cognitive Flexibility, and Inhibitory Control Differentially Predict Older and Younger Adults' Success Perceiving Speech by Talkers With Dysarthria
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Erin M. Ingvalson
    School of Communication Science and Disorders, Florida State University, Tallahassee
    Department of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL
  • Kaitlin L. Lansford
    School of Communication Science and Disorders, Florida State University, Tallahassee
  • Valeriya Fedorova
    School of Communication Science and Disorders, Florida State University, Tallahassee
  • Gabriel Fernandez
    School of Communication Science and Disorders, Florida State University, Tallahassee
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Erin M. Ingvalson: erin.ingvalson@cci.fsu.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Frederick (Erick) Gallun
    Editor-in-Chief: Frederick (Erick) Gallun×
  • Editor: Daniel Fogerty
    Editor: Daniel Fogerty×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Dysarthria / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Newly Published / Research Article
Research Article   |   December 04, 2017
Receptive Vocabulary, Cognitive Flexibility, and Inhibitory Control Differentially Predict Older and Younger Adults' Success Perceiving Speech by Talkers With Dysarthria
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-H-17-0119
History: Received April 3, 2017 , Revised June 12, 2017 , Accepted July 28, 2017
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-H-17-0119
History: Received April 3, 2017; Revised June 12, 2017; Accepted July 28, 2017

Purpose Previous research has demonstrated equivocal findings related to the effect of listener age on intelligibility ratings of dysarthric speech. The aim of the present study was to investigate the mechanisms that support younger and older adults' perception of speech by talkers with dysarthria.

Method Younger and older adults identified words in phrases produced by talkers with dysarthria. Listeners also completed assessments on peripheral hearing, receptive vocabulary, and executive control functions.

Results Older and younger adults did not differ in their ability to perceive speech by talkers with dysarthria. Younger adults' success in identifying words produced by talkers with dysarthria was associated only with their hearing acuity. In contrast, older adults showed effects of working memory and cognitive flexibility and interactions between hearing acuity and receptive vocabulary and between hearing acuity and inhibitory control.

Conclusions Although older and younger adults had equivalent performance identifying words produced by talkers with dysarthria, older adults appear to utilize more cognitive support to identify those words.

Acknowledgments
This research was funded in part by a grant from the Florida State University's Council for Research and Creativity's Committee on Faculty Research Support Program awarded to Erin M. Ingvalson. We wish to thank Cathryn Dobrowolski, Morgan Beard, Samantha Arvin, and Shelby Frazier for their help with data collection. In addition, we thank Julie Liss for the continued use of her extensive dysarthric speech sample database.
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