Developmental Associations Between Working Memory and Language in Children With Specific Language Impairment: A Longitudinal Study Purpose This longitudinal study examined differences in the development of working memory (WM) between children with specific language impairment (SLI) and typically developing (TD) children. Further, it explored to what extent language at ages 7–8 years could be predicted by measures of language and/or WM at ages 4–5 years. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   November 09, 2017
Developmental Associations Between Working Memory and Language in Children With Specific Language Impairment: A Longitudinal Study
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Brigitte Vugs
    Royal Dutch Kentalis, Sint-Michielsgestel, the Netherlands
  • Marc Hendriks
    Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University, Nijmegen, the Netherlands
    Academic Center for Epileptology, Kempenhaeghe, Heeze, the Netherlands
  • Juliane Cuperus
    Royal Dutch Kentalis, Sint-Michielsgestel, the Netherlands
    Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University, Nijmegen, the Netherlands
  • Harry Knoors
    Royal Dutch Kentalis, Sint-Michielsgestel, the Netherlands
    Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University, Nijmegen, the Netherlands
  • Ludo Verhoeven
    Royal Dutch Kentalis, Sint-Michielsgestel, the Netherlands
    Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University, Nijmegen, the Netherlands
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Brigitte Vugs: brigittevugs@gmail.com
  • Editor-in-Chief: Sean Redmond
    Editor-in-Chief: Sean Redmond×
  • Editor: Lisa Archibald
    Editor: Lisa Archibald×
Article Information
Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   November 09, 2017
Developmental Associations Between Working Memory and Language in Children With Specific Language Impairment: A Longitudinal Study
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, November 2017, Vol. 60, 3284-3294. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-L-17-0042
History: Received February 2, 2017 , Revised May 5, 2017 , Accepted July 11, 2017
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, November 2017, Vol. 60, 3284-3294. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-L-17-0042
History: Received February 2, 2017; Revised May 5, 2017; Accepted July 11, 2017

Purpose This longitudinal study examined differences in the development of working memory (WM) between children with specific language impairment (SLI) and typically developing (TD) children. Further, it explored to what extent language at ages 7–8 years could be predicted by measures of language and/or WM at ages 4–5 years.

Method Thirty children with SLI and 33 TD children who were previously examined on measures of WM and language at ages 4–5 years (T1) were reexamined at ages 7–8 years (T2).

Results The developmental course of WM was mostly similar for the two groups; only the development of the verbal storage component differed. At T1, children with SLI performed significantly below their TD peers on all components of WM (verbal storage, verbal central executive [CE], visuospatial storage, and visuospatial CE), whereas at T2, the differences for the visuospatial components were no longer significant when age and intelligence were taken into account. Hierarchical regression showed language and verbal CE at T1 to be significant predictors of language at T2, with no differences in the developmental associations between language and WM for the two groups.

Conclusions The results of this study suggest that particularly verbal CE is of importance for the acquisition of linguistic skills.

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