Auditory Attentional Set-Shifting and Inhibition in Children Who Stutter Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate whether previously reported parental questionnaire-based differences in attentional shifting and inhibitory control (AS and IC; Eggers, De Nil, & Van den Bergh, 2010) would be supported by direct measurement of AS and IC using a computer task. Method Participants ... Research Article
Research Article  |   November 09, 2017
Auditory Attentional Set-Shifting and Inhibition in Children Who Stutter
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kurt Eggers
    Department of Speech-Language Therapy and Audiology, Thomas More University College, Antwerp, Belgium
    Department of Psychology and Speech-Language Pathology, University of Turku, Finland
  • Eira Jansson-Verkasalo
    Department of Psychology and Speech-Language Pathology, University of Turku, Finland
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Kurt Eggers: kurt.eggers@thomasmore.be
  • Editor: Julie Liss
    Editor: Julie Liss×
  • Associate Editor: Hans-Georg Bosshardt
    Associate Editor: Hans-Georg Bosshardt×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   November 09, 2017
Auditory Attentional Set-Shifting and Inhibition in Children Who Stutter
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, November 2017, Vol. 60, 3159-3170. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-16-0096
History: Received March 3, 2016 , Revised October 19, 2016 , Accepted July 6, 2017
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, November 2017, Vol. 60, 3159-3170. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-16-0096
History: Received March 3, 2016; Revised October 19, 2016; Accepted July 6, 2017

Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate whether previously reported parental questionnaire-based differences in attentional shifting and inhibitory control (AS and IC; Eggers, De Nil, & Van den Bergh, 2010) would be supported by direct measurement of AS and IC using a computer task.

Method Participants were 16 Finnish children who stutter (CWS; mean age = 7.06 years) and 16 Finnish children who do not stutter (mean age = 7.05 years). Participants were matched on age (±8 months) and gender. AS and IC were assessed by the auditory set-shifting task of the Amsterdam Neuropsychological Tasks (De Sonneville, 2009).

Results No group differences were found for the speed of auditory AS or IC. However, CWS, as a group, scored significantly lower on the accuracy (error percentage) of auditory AS. In addition, CWS, compared with the children who do not stutter, showed a higher increase in error percentages under AS and IC conditions.

Conclusions The findings on error percentages partly corroborate earlier questionnaire-based findings showing difficulties in CWS on AS and IC. Moreover, it also seems to imply that CWS are less able to slow down their responses to achieve higher accuracy rates.

Acknowledgments
This study was supported by Thomas More University College and Turku University. We also would like to thank the children and parents who participated in this study and student Katri Aro for her assistance in processing some of the data.
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