A Method to Administer Agents to the Larynx in an Awake Large Animal Purpose This research note describes an adapted experimental methodology to administer an exogenous agent to the larynx and upper airway of awake animals. The exogenous agent could be a perturbation. In the current study, the agent was isotonic saline. Isotonic saline was selected because it is safe, of similar composition ... Research Note
Research Note  |   November 09, 2017
A Method to Administer Agents to the Larynx in an Awake Large Animal
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Abigail Durkes
    Department of Comparative Pathobiology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • M. Preeti Sivasankar
    Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Abigail Durkes: adcox@purdue.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Julie Liss
    Editor-in-Chief: Julie Liss×
  • Editor: Jack Jiang
    Editor: Jack Jiang×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Notes
Research Note   |   November 09, 2017
A Method to Administer Agents to the Larynx in an Awake Large Animal
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, November 2017, Vol. 60, 3171-3176. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-17-0040
History: Received February 1, 2017 , Revised April 12, 2017 , Accepted April 17, 2017
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, November 2017, Vol. 60, 3171-3176. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-17-0040
History: Received February 1, 2017; Revised April 12, 2017; Accepted April 17, 2017

Purpose This research note describes an adapted experimental methodology to administer an exogenous agent to the larynx and upper airway of awake animals. The exogenous agent could be a perturbation. In the current study, the agent was isotonic saline. Isotonic saline was selected because it is safe, of similar composition to extracellular fluid, and used in voice studies. The described approach allowed large animals such as pigs to be comfortably restrained without chemical sedation or anesthesia for extended periods while receiving the agent.

Method Six Sinclair pigs were successfully trained with positive reinforcement to voluntarily enter and then be restrained in a Panepinto Sling. Once restrained, the pigs accepted a nose cone that delivered nebulized isotonic saline. This procedure was repeated 3 times per day for 20 days. At the end of the study, the larynx and airway tissues were excised and examined using histology and transmission electron microscopy.

Results Pathology related to the procedure (i.e., nebulized inhaled isotonic saline or stress) was not identified in any examined tissues.

Conclusions This methodology allowed for repeated application of exogenous agents to awake, unstressed animals. This method can be used repeatedly in the laboratory to test various therapeutics for safety, toxicity, and dosage. Future studies will specifically manipulate the type of agent to further our understanding of laryngeal pathobiology.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by the National Institutes of Health (Grant RO1DC011759 awarded to M. Preeti Sivasankar). This study was performed in accordance with the PHS Policy on Humane Care and Use of Laboratory Animals, the NIH Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals, and the Animal Welfare Act (7 U.S.C. et seq.); the animal use protocol was approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee of Purdue University. The authors acknowledge Jessica Roller with her daily work with the animals.
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