Tongue- and Jaw-Specific Contributions to Acoustic Vowel Contrast Changes in the Diphthong /ai/ in Response to Slow, Loud, and Clear Speech Purpose This study sought to determine decoupled tongue and jaw displacement changes and their specific contributions to acoustic vowel contrast changes during slow, loud, and clear speech. Method Twenty typical talkers repeated “see a kite again” 5 times in 4 speech conditions (typical, slow, loud, clear). Speech kinematics ... Research Article
Research Article  |   November 09, 2017
Tongue- and Jaw-Specific Contributions to Acoustic Vowel Contrast Changes in the Diphthong /ai/ in Response to Slow, Loud, and Clear Speech
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Antje S. Mefferd
    Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN
  • Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Antje S. Mefferd: antje.mefferd@vanderbilt.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Julie Liss
    Editor-in-Chief: Julie Liss×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   November 09, 2017
Tongue- and Jaw-Specific Contributions to Acoustic Vowel Contrast Changes in the Diphthong /ai/ in Response to Slow, Loud, and Clear Speech
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, November 2017, Vol. 60, 3144-3158. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-17-0114
History: Received March 31, 2017 , Revised June 12, 2017 , Accepted June 15, 2017
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, November 2017, Vol. 60, 3144-3158. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-17-0114
History: Received March 31, 2017; Revised June 12, 2017; Accepted June 15, 2017

Purpose This study sought to determine decoupled tongue and jaw displacement changes and their specific contributions to acoustic vowel contrast changes during slow, loud, and clear speech.

Method Twenty typical talkers repeated “see a kite again” 5 times in 4 speech conditions (typical, slow, loud, clear). Speech kinematics were recorded using 3-dimensional electromagnetic articulography. Tongue composite displacement, decoupled tongue displacement, and jaw displacement during /ai/, as well as the distance between /a/ and /i/ in the F1–F2 vowel space, were examined during the diphthong /ai/ in “kite.”

Results Displacements significantly increased during all 3 speech modifications. However, jaw displacements increased significantly more during clear speech than during loud and slow speech, whereas decoupled tongue displacements increased significantly more during slow speech than during clear and loud speech. In addition, decoupled tongue displacements increased significantly more during clear speech than during loud speech. Increases in acoustic vowel contrast tended to be larger during slow speech than during clear speech and were predominantly tongue-driven, whereas those during clear speech were fairly equally accounted for by changes in decoupled tongue and jaw displacements. Increases in acoustic vowel contrast during loud speech were smallest and were predominantly tongue-driven, particularly in men.

Conclusions Findings suggest that task-specific patterns of decoupled tongue and jaw displacement change and task-specific patterns of decoupled tongue and jaw contributions to vowel acoustic change across these speech modifications. Clinical implications are discussed.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by start-up funds from Vanderbilt University Medical Center and Grant R03DC015075 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, awarded to the author. I would like to thank Brett Myers, Ellen Hart, Sophie Mouros, Jaclyn Fitzsimmons, Mary Jo Bissmeyer, and Randy Hiroshige for their assistance with data collection and analysis. Special thanks also to my colleague Daniel Ashmead for his input on the decoupling algorithm and Kris Tjaden for inspiring conversations and suggestions throughout this project. The content is solely the responsibility of the author and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.
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