Speech Perception in Complex Acoustic Environments: Developmental Effects Purpose The ability to hear and understand speech in complex acoustic environments follows a prolonged time course of development. The purpose of this article is to provide a general overview of the literature describing age effects in susceptibility to auditory masking in the context of speech recognition, including a summary ... Review Article
Review Article  |   October 17, 2017
Speech Perception in Complex Acoustic Environments: Developmental Effects
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lori J. Leibold
    Center for Hearing Research, Boys Town National Research Hospital, Omaha, NE
  • Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Lori J. Leibold: lori.leibold@boystown.org
  • Editor-in-Chief: Frederick (Erick) Gallun
    Editor-in-Chief: Frederick (Erick) Gallun×
  • Editor: Karen Helfer
    Editor: Karen Helfer×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Research Forum: Advances in Research on Auditory Attention and the Processing of Complex Auditory Stimuli / Review Articles
Review Article   |   October 17, 2017
Speech Perception in Complex Acoustic Environments: Developmental Effects
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2017, Vol. 60, 3001-3008. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-H-17-0070
History: Received February 20, 2017 , Revised May 9, 2017 , Accepted June 19, 2017
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2017, Vol. 60, 3001-3008. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-H-17-0070
History: Received February 20, 2017; Revised May 9, 2017; Accepted June 19, 2017

Purpose The ability to hear and understand speech in complex acoustic environments follows a prolonged time course of development. The purpose of this article is to provide a general overview of the literature describing age effects in susceptibility to auditory masking in the context of speech recognition, including a summary of findings related to the maturation of processes thought to facilitate segregation of target from competing speech.

Method Data from published and ongoing studies are discussed, with a focus on synthesizing results from studies that address age-related changes in the ability to perceive speech in the presence of a small number of competing talkers.

Conclusions This review provides a summary of the current state of knowledge that is valuable for researchers and clinicians. It highlights the importance of considering listener factors, such as age and hearing status, as well as stimulus factors, such as masker type, when interpreting masked speech recognition data.

Presentation Video http://cred.pubs.asha.org/article.aspx?articleid=2601620

Acknowledgments
Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Awards R13DC003383 and R01DC011038 (awarded to Lori J. Leibold). The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health. Work conducted in my laboratory is a collaborative effort, and I had the great fortune to work with Emily Buss and Lauren Calandruccio on many of the studies reported in this review. I am also grateful to the outstanding members of the Human Auditory Development Laboratory.
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