Architecture of the Suprahyoid Muscles: A Volumetric Musculoaponeurotic Analysis Purpose Suprahyoid muscles play a critical role in swallowing. The arrangement of the fiber bundles and aponeuroses has not been investigated volumetrically, even though muscle architecture is an important determinant of function. Thus, the purpose was to digitize, model in three dimensions, and quantify the architectural parameters of the suprahyoid ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 17, 2017
Architecture of the Suprahyoid Muscles: A Volumetric Musculoaponeurotic Analysis
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Stephanie M. Shaw
    Department of Speech-Language Pathology, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Rosemary Martino
    Department of Speech-Language Pathology, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Department of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Health Care and Outcomes Research, Toronto Western Research Institute, University Health Network, Ontario, Canada
  • Ali Mahdi
    Department of Surgery, Division of Anatomy, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Forrest Kip Sawyer
    Department of Surgery, Division of Anatomy, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Sunita Mathur
    Department of Physical Therapy, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Andrew Hope
    Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Anne M. Agur
    Department of Surgery, Division of Anatomy, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Stephanie M. Shaw: stephanie.shaw@mail.utoronto.ca
  • Editor: Julie Liss
    Editor: Julie Liss×
  • Associate Editor: Jack Jiang
    Associate Editor: Jack Jiang×
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 17, 2017
Architecture of the Suprahyoid Muscles: A Volumetric Musculoaponeurotic Analysis
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2017, Vol. 60, 2808-2818. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-16-0277
History: Received July 3, 2016 , Revised January 10, 2017 , Accepted May 13, 2017
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2017, Vol. 60, 2808-2818. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-16-0277
History: Received July 3, 2016; Revised January 10, 2017; Accepted May 13, 2017

Purpose Suprahyoid muscles play a critical role in swallowing. The arrangement of the fiber bundles and aponeuroses has not been investigated volumetrically, even though muscle architecture is an important determinant of function. Thus, the purpose was to digitize, model in three dimensions, and quantify the architectural parameters of the suprahyoid muscles to determine and compare their relative functional capabilities.

Method Fiber bundles and aponeuroses from 11 formalin-embalmed specimens were serially dissected and digitized in situ. Data were reconstructed in three dimensions using Autodesk Maya. Architectural parameters were quantified, and data were compared using independent samples t-tests and analyses of variance.

Results Based on architecture and attachment sites, suprahyoid muscles were divided into 3 groups: anteromedial, superolateral, and superoposterior. Architectural parameters differed significantly (p < .05) across muscles and across the 3 groups, suggesting differential roles in hyoid movement during swallowing. When activated simultaneously, anteromedial and superoposterior muscle groups could work together to elevate the hyoid.

Conclusions The results suggest that the suprahyoid muscles can have individualized roles in hyoid excursion during swallowing. Muscle balance may be important for identifying and treating hyolaryngeal dysfunction in patients with dysphagia.

Acknowledgments
The authors would like to thank Tin Yan Chan for her help with digitization and Anton Semechko, Zhi Li, Shannon Roberts, and Dongwoon Lee for their help with modeling and data analysis. This research was funded by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) Collaborative Research and Development Grant and Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR, operating grant 93685). S.M.S. received support from a Connaught International Scholarship for Doctoral Students, and R.M. holds a Canada Research Chair (Tier II) in Swallowing Disorders.
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