Investigating the Role of Salivary Cortisol on Vocal Symptoms Purpose We investigated whether participants who reported more often occurring vocal symptoms showed higher salivary cortisol levels and if such possible associations were different for men and women. Method The participants (N = 170; men n = 49, women n = 121) consisted of a population-based sample of ... Research Article
Newly Published
Research Article  |   September 15, 2017
Investigating the Role of Salivary Cortisol on Vocal Symptoms
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sofia Holmqvist
    Faculty of Arts, Psychology and Theology, Åbo Akademi University, Turku, Finland
  • Ada Johansson
    Faculty of Arts, Psychology and Theology, Åbo Akademi University, Turku, Finland
    Department of Psychology and Speech-Language Pathology, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Turku, Turku, Finland
  • Pekka Santtila
    Faculty of Arts, Psychology and Theology, Åbo Akademi University, Turku, Finland
  • Lars Westberg
    Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden
  • Bettina von der Pahlen
    Faculty of Arts, Psychology and Theology, Åbo Akademi University, Turku, Finland
  • Susanna Simberg
    Faculty of Arts, Psychology and Theology, Åbo Akademi University, Turku, Finland
    Department of Special Needs Education, Faculty of Educational Sciences, University of Oslo, Norway
  • Disclosure : The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure : The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Sofia Holmqvist: soholmqv@abo.fi
  • Editor: Julie Liss
    Editor: Julie Liss×
  • Associate Editor: Julie Liss
    Associate Editor: Julie Liss×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Newly Published / Research Article
Research Article   |   September 15, 2017
Investigating the Role of Salivary Cortisol on Vocal Symptoms
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-16-0058
History: Received February 10, 2016 , Revised November 18, 2016 , Accepted April 19, 2017
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-16-0058
History: Received February 10, 2016; Revised November 18, 2016; Accepted April 19, 2017

Purpose We investigated whether participants who reported more often occurring vocal symptoms showed higher salivary cortisol levels and if such possible associations were different for men and women.

Method The participants (N = 170; men n = 49, women n = 121) consisted of a population-based sample of Finnish twins born between 1961 and 1989. The participants submitted saliva samples for hormone analysis and completed a web questionnaire including questions regarding the occurrence of 6 vocal symptoms during the past 12 months. The data were analyzed using the generalized estimated equations method.

Results A composite variable of the vocal symptoms showed a significant positive association with salivary cortisol levels (p < .001). Three of the 6 vocal symptoms were significantly associated with the level of cortisol when analyzed separately (p values less than .05). The results showed no gender difference regarding the effect of salivary cortisol on vocal symptoms.

Conclusions There was a positive association between the occurrence of vocal symptoms and salivary cortisol levels. Participants with higher cortisol levels reported more often occurring vocal symptoms. This could have a connection to the influence of stress on vocal symptoms because stress is a known risk factor of vocal symptoms and salivary cortisol can be seen as a biomarker for stress.

Acknowledgment
Preliminary results of this research were presented in a poster session at the Pan-European Voice Conference PEVOC 11, August 31–September 2, 2015, Florence, Italy.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access