Language Sample Analysis and Elicitation Technique Effects in Bilingual Children With and Without Language Impairment Purpose This study examined whether the language sample elicitation technique (i.e., storytelling and story-retelling tasks with pictorial support) affects lexical diversity (D), grammaticality (grammatical errors per communication unit [GE/CU]), sentence length (mean length of utterance in words [MLUw]), and sentence complexity (subordination index [SI]), which are commonly used indices for ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 17, 2017
Language Sample Analysis and Elicitation Technique Effects in Bilingual Children With and Without Language Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Maria Kapantzoglou
    Portland State University, Oregon
  • Gerasimos Fergadiotis
    Portland State University, Oregon
  • M. Adelaida Restrepo
    Arizona State University, Tempe
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Maria Kapantzoglou: kapantzogloumaria@hotmail.com
  • Editor: Sean Redmond
    Editor: Sean Redmond×
  • Associate Editor: Jan de Jong
    Associate Editor: Jan de Jong×
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Language Disorders / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 17, 2017
Language Sample Analysis and Elicitation Technique Effects in Bilingual Children With and Without Language Impairment
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2017, Vol. 60, 2852-2864. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-L-16-0335
History: Received August 22, 2016 , Revised February 3, 2017 , Accepted March 23, 2017
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2017, Vol. 60, 2852-2864. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-L-16-0335
History: Received August 22, 2016; Revised February 3, 2017; Accepted March 23, 2017

Purpose This study examined whether the language sample elicitation technique (i.e., storytelling and story-retelling tasks with pictorial support) affects lexical diversity (D), grammaticality (grammatical errors per communication unit [GE/CU]), sentence length (mean length of utterance in words [MLUw]), and sentence complexity (subordination index [SI]), which are commonly used indices for diagnosing primary language impairment in Spanish–English-speaking children in the United States.

Method Twenty bilingual Spanish–English-speaking children with typical language development and 20 with primary language impairment participated in the study. Four analyses of variance were conducted to evaluate the effect of language elicitation technique and group on D, GE/CU, MLUw, and SI. Also, 2 discriminant analyses were conducted to assess which indices were more effective for story retelling and storytelling and their classification accuracy across elicitation techniques.

Results D, MLUw, and SI were influenced by the type of elicitation technique, but GE/CU was not. The classification accuracy of language sample analysis was greater in story retelling than in storytelling, with GE/CU and D being useful indicators of language abilities in story retelling and GE/CU and SI in storytelling.

Conclusion Two indices in language sample analysis may be sufficient for diagnosis in 4- to 5-year-old bilingual Spanish–English-speaking children.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by the Institute of Education Sciences Grant R305G05025 awarded to Vera Gutiérrez-Clellen (principal investigator) at San Diego State University and M. Adelaida Restrepo (co-principal investigator) at Arizona State University. The authors thank the children, families, and schools that participated in the study.
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