Error Type and Lexical Frequency Effects: Error Detection in Swedish Children With Language Impairment Purpose The first aim of this study was to investigate if Swedish-speaking school-age children with language impairment (LI) show specific morphosyntactic vulnerabilities in error detection. The second aim was to investigate the effects of lexical frequency on error detection, an overlooked aspect of previous error detection studies. Method ... Research Note
Newly Published
Research Note  |   September 14, 2017
Error Type and Lexical Frequency Effects: Error Detection in Swedish Children With Language Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Anna Eva Hallin
    Department of Communicative Sciences and Disorders, New York University
  • Christina Reuterskiöld
    Department of Communicative Sciences and Disorders, New York University
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Anna Eva Hallin, who is now at Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Division of Speech Language Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden: annaeva.hallin@ki.se
  • This work is part of Anna Eva Hallin's dissertation study at Department of Communicative Sciences and Disorders, New York University.
    This work is part of Anna Eva Hallin's dissertation study at Department of Communicative Sciences and Disorders, New York University.×
  • Editor: Sean Redmond
    Editor: Sean Redmond×
  • Associate Editor: Jan de Jong
    Associate Editor: Jan de Jong×
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Language Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Newly Published / Research Note
Research Note   |   September 14, 2017
Error Type and Lexical Frequency Effects: Error Detection in Swedish Children With Language Impairment
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-L-16-0294
History: Received July 19, 2016 , Revised January 3, 2017 , Accepted May 17, 2017
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-L-16-0294
History: Received July 19, 2016; Revised January 3, 2017; Accepted May 17, 2017

Purpose The first aim of this study was to investigate if Swedish-speaking school-age children with language impairment (LI) show specific morphosyntactic vulnerabilities in error detection. The second aim was to investigate the effects of lexical frequency on error detection, an overlooked aspect of previous error detection studies.

Method Error sensitivity for grammatical structures vulnerable in Swedish-speaking preschool children with LI (omission of the indefinite article in a noun phrase with a neuter/common noun, and use of the infinitive instead of past-tense regular and irregular verbs) was compared to a control error (singular noun instead of plural). Target structures involved a high-frequency (HF) or a low-frequency (LF) noun/verb. Grammatical and ungrammatical sentences were presented in headphones, and responses were collected through button presses.

Results Children with LI had similar sensitivity to the plural control error as peers with typical language development, but lower sensitivity to past-tense errors and noun phrase errors. All children showed lexical frequency effects for errors involving verbs (HF > LF), and noun gender effects for noun phrase errors (common > neuter).

Conclusions School-age children with LI may have subtle difficulties with morphosyntactic processing that mirror expressive difficulties in preschool children with LI. Lexical frequency may affect morphosyntactic processing, which has clinical implications for assessment of grammatical knowledge.

Acknowledgments
The authors want to thank participating students, parents, and teachers and the Röstkonsulten Speech and Language Clinic in Stockholm. Thank you to Susannah Levi, Richard Schwartz, and Sven Strömqvist for valuable input. This study is part of Anna Eva Hallin's doctoral dissertation at New York University and was supported by a New York University Steinhardt School of Culture, Education and Human Development Challenge Grant.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access