Speech Recognition and Cognitive Skills in Bimodal Cochlear Implant Users Purpose To examine the relation between speech recognition and cognitive skills in bimodal cochlear implant (CI) and hearing aid users. Method Seventeen bimodal CI users (28–74 years) were recruited to the study. Speech recognition tests were carried out in quiet and in noise. The cognitive tests employed included ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 18, 2017
Speech Recognition and Cognitive Skills in Bimodal Cochlear Implant Users
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Håkan Hua
    Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping, Sweden
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Sweden
  • Björn Johansson
    Department of Audiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden
  • Lennart Magnusson
    Department of Audiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden
  • Björn Lyxell
    Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping, Sweden
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Sweden
  • Rachel J. Ellis
    Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping, Sweden
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Sweden
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Håkan Hua: huahakan@aol.com
  • Editor: Frederick (Erick) Gallun
    Editor: Frederick (Erick) Gallun×
  • Associate Editor: Mitchell Sommers
    Associate Editor: Mitchell Sommers×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 18, 2017
Speech Recognition and Cognitive Skills in Bimodal Cochlear Implant Users
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 2017, Vol. 60, 2752-2763. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-H-16-0276
History: Received July 5, 2016 , Revised December 3, 2016 , Accepted May 21, 2017
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 2017, Vol. 60, 2752-2763. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-H-16-0276
History: Received July 5, 2016; Revised December 3, 2016; Accepted May 21, 2017

Purpose To examine the relation between speech recognition and cognitive skills in bimodal cochlear implant (CI) and hearing aid users.

Method Seventeen bimodal CI users (28–74 years) were recruited to the study. Speech recognition tests were carried out in quiet and in noise. The cognitive tests employed included the Reading Span Test and the Trail Making Test (Daneman & Carpenter, 1980; Reitan, 1958, 1992), measuring working memory capacity and processing speed and executive functioning, respectively. Data were analyzed using paired-sample t tests, Pearson correlations, and partial correlations controlling for age.

Results The results indicate that performance on some cognitive tests predicts speech recognition and that bimodal listening generates a significant improvement in speech in quiet compared to unilateral CI listening. However, the current results also suggest that bimodal listening requires different cognitive skills than does unimodal CI listening. This is likely to relate to the relative difficulty of having to integrate 2 different signals and then map the integrated signal to representations stored in the long-term memory.

Conclusions Even though participants obtained speech recognition benefit from bimodal listening, the results suggest that processing bimodal stimuli involves different cognitive skills than does unimodal conditions in quiet. Thus, clinically, it is important to consider this when assessing treatment outcomes.

Acknowledgments
The authors wish to thank Jerker Rönnberg and Mitchell Sommers.
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