Inner Speech's Relationship With Overt Speech in Poststroke Aphasia Purpose Relatively preserved inner speech alongside poor overt speech has been documented in some persons with aphasia (PWA), but the relationship of overt speech with inner speech is still largely unclear, as few studies have directly investigated these factors. The present study investigates the relationship of relatively preserved inner speech ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 18, 2017
Inner Speech's Relationship With Overt Speech in Poststroke Aphasia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Brielle C. Stark
    University of Cambridge, England
  • Sharon Geva
    University College London, England
  • Elizabeth A. Warburton
    University of Cambridge, England
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to B. C. Stark, who is now at the University of South Carolina, Columbia: stark2@mailbox.sc.edu
  • Editor: Julie Liss
    Editor: Julie Liss×
  • Associate Editor: Tanya Eadie
    Associate Editor: Tanya Eadie×
Article Information
Telepractice & Computer-Based Approaches / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 18, 2017
Inner Speech's Relationship With Overt Speech in Poststroke Aphasia
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 2017, Vol. 60, 2406-2415. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-16-0270
History: Received June 27, 2016 , Revised January 17, 2017 , Accepted March 25, 2017
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 2017, Vol. 60, 2406-2415. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-16-0270
History: Received June 27, 2016; Revised January 17, 2017; Accepted March 25, 2017

Purpose Relatively preserved inner speech alongside poor overt speech has been documented in some persons with aphasia (PWA), but the relationship of overt speech with inner speech is still largely unclear, as few studies have directly investigated these factors. The present study investigates the relationship of relatively preserved inner speech in aphasia with selected measures of language and cognition.

Method Thirty-eight persons with chronic aphasia (27 men, 11 women; average age 64.53 ± 13.29 years, time since stroke 8–111 months) were classified as having relatively preserved inner and overt speech (n = 21), relatively preserved inner speech with poor overt speech (n = 8), or not classified due to insufficient measurements of inner and/or overt speech (n = 9). Inner speech scores (by group) were correlated with selected measures of language and cognition from the Comprehensive Aphasia Test (Swinburn, Porter, & Al, 2004).

Results The group with poor overt speech showed a significant relationship of inner speech with overt naming (r = .95, p < .01) and with mean length of utterance produced during a written picture description (r = .96, p < .01). Correlations between inner speech and language and cognition factors were not significant for the group with relatively good overt speech.

Conclusions As in previous research, we show that relatively preserved inner speech is found alongside otherwise severe production deficits in PWA. PWA with poor overt speech may rely more on preserved inner speech for overt picture naming (perhaps due to shared resources with verbal working memory) and for written picture description (perhaps due to reliance on inner speech due to perceived task difficulty). Assessments of inner speech may be useful as a standard component of aphasia screening, and therapy focused on improving and using inner speech may prove clinically worthwhile.

Supplemental Materials https://doi.org/10.23641/asha.5303542

Acknowledgments
B. C. Stark's work at the University of Cambridge was made possible by the Gates Cambridge Trust, Cambridge, UK. S. Geva was supported by the Pinsent–Darwin Fellowship, Cambridge, UK; the Harold Hyam Wingate Scholarship, London, UK; Cambridge Overseas Trust, Cambridge, UK; and B'nai B'rith Scholarship, London, UK. E. A. Warburton was supported by the Biomedical Centre Grant to the University of Cambridge from the National Institute of Health Research.
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