Short-Term Effect of Two Semi-Occluded Vocal Tract Training Programs on the Vocal Quality of Future Occupational Voice Users: “Resonant Voice Training Using Nasal Consonants” Versus “Straw Phonation” Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine the short-term effect of 2 semi-occluded vocal tract training programs, “resonant voice training using nasal consonants” versus “straw phonation,” on the vocal quality of vocally healthy future occupational voice users. Method A multigroup pretest–posttest randomized control group design was ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 18, 2017
Short-Term Effect of Two Semi-Occluded Vocal Tract Training Programs on the Vocal Quality of Future Occupational Voice Users: “Resonant Voice Training Using Nasal Consonants” Versus “Straw Phonation”
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Iris Meerschman
    Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences, Ghent University, Belgium
  • Kristiane Van Lierde
    Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences, Ghent University, Belgium
    Department of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, University of Pretoria, South Africa
  • Karen Peeters
    Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences, Ghent University, Belgium
  • Eline Meersman
    Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences, Ghent University, Belgium
  • Sofie Claeys
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Ghent University, Belgium
  • Evelien D'haeseleer
    Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences, Ghent University, Belgium
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Iris Meerschman: iris.meerschman@ugent.be
  • Editor-in-Chief: Julie Liss
    Editor-in-Chief: Julie Liss×
  • Editor: Jack Jiang
    Editor: Jack Jiang×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 18, 2017
Short-Term Effect of Two Semi-Occluded Vocal Tract Training Programs on the Vocal Quality of Future Occupational Voice Users: “Resonant Voice Training Using Nasal Consonants” Versus “Straw Phonation”
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 2017, Vol. 60, 2519-2536. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-17-0017
History: Received January 14, 2017 , Revised April 4, 2017 , Accepted May 2, 2017
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 2017, Vol. 60, 2519-2536. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-17-0017
History: Received January 14, 2017; Revised April 4, 2017; Accepted May 2, 2017

Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine the short-term effect of 2 semi-occluded vocal tract training programs, “resonant voice training using nasal consonants” versus “straw phonation,” on the vocal quality of vocally healthy future occupational voice users.

Method A multigroup pretest–posttest randomized control group design was used. Thirty healthy speech-language pathology students with a mean age of 19 years (range: 17–22 years) were randomly assigned into a resonant voice training group (practicing resonant exercises across 6 weeks, n = 10), a straw phonation group (practicing straw phonation across 6 weeks, n = 10), or a control group (receiving no voice training, n = 10). A voice assessment protocol consisting of both subjective (questionnaire, participant's self-report, auditory–perceptual evaluation) and objective (maximum performance task, aerodynamic assessment, voice range profile, acoustic analysis, acoustic voice quality index, dysphonia severity index) measurements and determinations was used to evaluate the participants' voice pre- and posttraining. Groups were compared over time using linear mixed models and generalized linear mixed models. Within-group effects of time were determined using post hoc pairwise comparisons.

Results No significant time × group interactions were found for any of the outcome measures, indicating no differences in evolution over time among the 3 groups. Within-group effects of time showed a significant improvement in dysphonia severity index in the resonant voice training group, and a significant improvement in the intensity range in the straw phonation group.

Conclusions Results suggest that the semi-occluded vocal tract training programs using resonant voice training and straw phonation may have a positive impact on the vocal quality and vocal capacities of future occupational voice users. The resonant voice training caused an improved dysphonia severity index, and the straw phonation training caused an expansion of the intensity range in this population.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access