A Preliminary Comparison of Reading Subtypes in a Clinical Sample of Children With Specific Language Impairment Purpose The purpose of this preliminary study was to (a) compare the pattern of reading subtypes among a clinical sample of children with specific language impairment (SLI) and children with typical language and (b) evaluate phonological and nonphonological language deficits within each reading impairment subtype. Method Participants were ... Research Note
Research Note  |   September 18, 2017
A Preliminary Comparison of Reading Subtypes in a Clinical Sample of Children With Specific Language Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Krystal L. Werfel
    University of South Carolina, Columbia
  • Hannah Krimm
    Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Krystal L. Werfel: werfel@sc.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Sean Redmond
    Editor-in-Chief: Sean Redmond×
  • Editor: Megan Dunn Davison
    Editor: Megan Dunn Davison×
Article Information
Development / Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Reading & Writing Disorders / Language / Research Notes
Research Note   |   September 18, 2017
A Preliminary Comparison of Reading Subtypes in a Clinical Sample of Children With Specific Language Impairment
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 2017, Vol. 60, 2680-2686. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-L-17-0059
History: Received February 10, 2017 , Revised April 3, 2017 , Accepted April 19, 2017
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 2017, Vol. 60, 2680-2686. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-L-17-0059
History: Received February 10, 2017; Revised April 3, 2017; Accepted April 19, 2017

Purpose The purpose of this preliminary study was to (a) compare the pattern of reading subtypes among a clinical sample of children with specific language impairment (SLI) and children with typical language and (b) evaluate phonological and nonphonological language deficits within each reading impairment subtype.

Method Participants were 32 children with SLI and 39 children with typical language in Grades 2 through 4. Each child was classified as demonstrating 1 of 4 reading subtypes on the basis of word-level and text-level skills: typical reading, dyslexia, specific reading comprehension impairment, or garden variety reading impairment. In addition, phonological and nonphonological language skills were evaluated.

Results Children with SLI were more likely to exhibit reading impairments than children with typical language. Children with SLI were more likely to exhibit text-level deficits than children with typical language. Phonological language deficits were observed in children with word-level deficits, and nonphonological language deficits were observed in children with text-level deficits.

Conclusions The results indicate that the patterns of reading subtypes differ among children with SLI and children with typical language. The findings highlight the importance of simultaneously but separately considering word-level and text-level skills in studies of reading impairment.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by the 2012 Jeanne S. Chall Research Fellowship (principal investigator: Werfel) from the International Reading Association, two Preparation of Leadership Personnel grants (H325D080075 and H325D140087, principal investigator: Schuele) from the U.S. Department of Education, and the Vanderbilt CTSA Grant UL1 RR024975 (principal investigator: Bernard) from National Center for Research Resources/National Institutes of Health (NCRR/NIH). Study data were managed using REDCap electronic data capture tools hosted at Vanderbilt University (1 UL1 RR024975 from NCRR/NIH, principal investigator: Bernard). The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily reflect the views of the International Reading Association, U.S. Department of Education, or National Institutes of Health.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access