Author Impact Metrics in Communication Sciences and Disorder Research Purpose The purpose was to examine author-level impact metrics for faculty in the communication sciences and disorder research field across a variety of databases. Method Author-level impact metrics were collected for faculty from 257 accredited universities in the United States and Canada. Three databases (i.e., Google Scholar, ResearchGate, ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 18, 2017
Author Impact Metrics in Communication Sciences and Disorder Research
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Andrew Stuart
    East Carolina University, Greenville, NC
  • Sarah P. Faucette
    East Carolina University, Greenville, NC
  • William Joseph Thomas
    East Carolina University, Greenville, NC
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Andrew Stuart: stuarta@ecu.edu
  • Editor: Frederick (Erick) Gallun
    Editor: Frederick (Erick) Gallun×
  • Associate Editor: Jennifer Lentz
    Associate Editor: Jennifer Lentz×
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 18, 2017
Author Impact Metrics in Communication Sciences and Disorder Research
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 2017, Vol. 60, 2704-2724. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-H-16-0458
History: Received December 19, 2016 , Revised February 20, 2017 , Accepted March 13, 2017
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 2017, Vol. 60, 2704-2724. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-H-16-0458
History: Received December 19, 2016; Revised February 20, 2017; Accepted March 13, 2017

Purpose The purpose was to examine author-level impact metrics for faculty in the communication sciences and disorder research field across a variety of databases.

Method Author-level impact metrics were collected for faculty from 257 accredited universities in the United States and Canada. Three databases (i.e., Google Scholar, ResearchGate, and Scopus) were utilized.

Results Faculty expertise was in audiology (24.4%; n = 490) and speech-language pathology (75.6%; n = 1,520). Women comprised 68.1% of faculty, and men comprised 31.9% of faculty. The percentage of faculty in the field of communication sciences and disorders identified in each database was 10.5% (n = 212), 44.0% (n = 885), and 84.4% (n = 1,696) for Google Scholar, ResearchGate, and Scopus, respectively. In general, author-level impact metrics were positively skewed. Metric values increased significantly with increasing academic rank (p < .05), were greater for men versus women (p < .05), and were greater for those in audiology versus speech-language pathology (p < .05). There were statistically significant positive correlations between all author-level metrics (p < .01).

Conclusions These author-level metrics may serve as a benchmark for scholarly production of those in the field of communication sciences and disorders and may assist with professional identity management, tenure and promotion review, grant applications, and employment.

Acknowledgments
This research was presented in part at the 2015 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Annual Convention, Denver, CO, and the 2016 Annual Convention of the North Carolina Speech, Hearing, and Language Association, Raleigh, NC. Amber F. P. Jackson and Melissa N. Work assisted with data collection. This work is dedicated to a friend and colleague of great impact—Joseph Kalinowski.
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