Alveolar and Postalveolar Voiceless Fricative and Affricate Productions of Spanish–English Bilingual Children With Cochlear Implants Purpose This study investigates the production of voiceless alveolar and postalveolar fricatives and affricates by bilingual and monolingual children with hearing loss who use cochlear implants (CIs) and their peers with normal hearing (NH). Method Fifty-four children participated in our study, including 12 Spanish–English bilingual CI users (M ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 18, 2017
Alveolar and Postalveolar Voiceless Fricative and Affricate Productions of Spanish–English Bilingual Children With Cochlear Implants
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Fangfang Li
    Department of Psychology, University of Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada
  • Ferenc Bunta
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Houston, TX
  • J. Bruce Tomblin
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, The University of Iowa, Iowa City
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Fangfang Li: fangfang.li@uleth.ca
  • Editor: Julie Liss
    Editor: Julie Liss×
  • Associate Editor: Susan Nittrouer
    Associate Editor: Susan Nittrouer×
Article Information
Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 18, 2017
Alveolar and Postalveolar Voiceless Fricative and Affricate Productions of Spanish–English Bilingual Children With Cochlear Implants
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 2017, Vol. 60, 2427-2441. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-16-0125
History: Received March 29, 2016 , Revised December 19, 2016 , Accepted April 4, 2017
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 2017, Vol. 60, 2427-2441. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-16-0125
History: Received March 29, 2016; Revised December 19, 2016; Accepted April 4, 2017

Purpose This study investigates the production of voiceless alveolar and postalveolar fricatives and affricates by bilingual and monolingual children with hearing loss who use cochlear implants (CIs) and their peers with normal hearing (NH).

Method Fifty-four children participated in our study, including 12 Spanish–English bilingual CI users (M = 6;0 [years;months]), 12 monolingual English-speaking children with CIs (M = 6;1), 20 bilingual children with NH (M = 6;5), and 10 monolingual English-speaking children with NH (M = 5;10). Picture elicitation targeting /s/, /tʃ/, and /ʃ/ was administered. Repeated-measures analyses of variance comparing group means for frication duration, rise time, and centroid frequency were conducted for the effects of CI use and bilingualism.

Results All groups distinguished the target sounds in the 3 acoustic parameters examined. Regarding frication duration and rise time, the Spanish productions of bilingual children with CIs differed from their bilingual peers with NH. English frication duration patterns for bilingual versus monolingual CI users also differed. Centroid frequency was a stronger place cue for children with NH than for children with CIs.

Conclusion Patterns of fricative and affricate production display effects of bilingualism and diminished signal, yielding unique patterns for bilingual and monolingual CI users.

Acknowledgments
The project described was supported by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant R03DC012640 to the second author. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. We also want to thank the participants and their parents/legal guardians for choosing to take part in the study. We are grateful for the assistance of Rebecca Gonzalez, Amy Cantu, Hanna Dickson, Jennifer Wickesberg, and the teachers and staff at the Center for Hearing and Speech in Houston.
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