Glottal Aerodynamic Measures in Women With Phonotraumatic and Nonphonotraumatic Vocal Hyperfunction Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine the validity of preliminary reports showing that glottal aerodynamic measures can identify pathophysiological phonatory mechanisms for phonotraumatic and nonphonotraumatic vocal hyperfunction, which are each distinctly different from normal vocal function. Method Glottal aerodynamic measures (estimates of subglottal air pressure, ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 16, 2017
Glottal Aerodynamic Measures in Women With Phonotraumatic and Nonphonotraumatic Vocal Hyperfunction
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Víctor M. Espinoza
    Department of Electronic Engineering, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, Valparaíso, Chile
    Department of Sound, Universidad de Chile, Santiago
  • Matías Zañartu
    Department of Electronic Engineering, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, Valparaíso, Chile
  • Jarrad H. Van Stan
    Center for Laryngeal Surgery & Voice Rehabilitation, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston
    MGH Institute of Health Professions, Boston, MA
    Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
  • Daryush D. Mehta
    Center for Laryngeal Surgery & Voice Rehabilitation, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston
    MGH Institute of Health Professions, Boston, MA
    Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
  • Robert E. Hillman
    Center for Laryngeal Surgery & Voice Rehabilitation, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston
    MGH Institute of Health Professions, Boston, MA
    Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Matías Zañartu: matias.zanartu@usm.cl
  • Editor: Julie Liss
    Editor: Julie Liss×
  • Associate Editor: Nelson Roy
    Associate Editor: Nelson Roy×
Article Information
Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 16, 2017
Glottal Aerodynamic Measures in Women With Phonotraumatic and Nonphonotraumatic Vocal Hyperfunction
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2017, Vol. 60, 2159-2169. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-16-0337
History: Received August 24, 2016 , Revised February 11, 2017 , Accepted March 12, 2017
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2017, Vol. 60, 2159-2169. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-16-0337
History: Received August 24, 2016; Revised February 11, 2017; Accepted March 12, 2017

Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine the validity of preliminary reports showing that glottal aerodynamic measures can identify pathophysiological phonatory mechanisms for phonotraumatic and nonphonotraumatic vocal hyperfunction, which are each distinctly different from normal vocal function.

Method Glottal aerodynamic measures (estimates of subglottal air pressure, peak-to-peak airflow, maximum flow declination rate, and open quotient) were obtained noninvasively using a pneumotachograph mask with an intraoral pressure catheter in 16 women with organic vocal fold lesions, 16 women with muscle tension dysphonia, and 2 associated matched control groups with normal voices. Subjects produced /pae/ syllable strings from which glottal airflow was estimated using inverse filtering during /ae/ vowels, and subglottal pressure was estimated during /p/ closures. All measures were normalized for sound pressure level (SPL) and statistically tested for differences between patient and control groups.

Results All SPL-normalized measures were significantly lower in the phonotraumatic group as compared with measures in its control group. For the nonphonotraumatic group, only SPL-normalized subglottal pressure and open quotient were significantly lower than measures in its control group.

Conclusions Results of this study confirm previous hypotheses and preliminary results indicating that SPL-normalized estimates of glottal aerodynamic measures can be used to describe the different pathophysiological phonatory mechanisms associated with phonotraumatic and nonphonotraumatic vocal hyperfunction.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported in part by grants from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (Grants R33 DC011588 and P50 DC015446 awarded to Robert E. Hillman and Grant F31 DC014412 awarded to Jarrad H. Van Stan), CONICYT (Grants FONDECYT 1151077 and BASAL FB0008 awarded to Matías Zañartu), and UTFSM (Grants PIIC 2014 and FSM1204 awarded to Víctor M. Espinoza). This work was also conducted with support (statistical consultation from Dr. Mark Vangel) from Harvard Catalyst: The Harvard Clinical and Translational Science Center (National Center for Research Resources and the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health Award UL1 TR001102, awarded to Lee M. Nadler) and financial contributions from Harvard University and its affiliated academic health care centers. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of Harvard Catalyst, Harvard University and its affiliated academic health care centers, or the National Institutes of Health.
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