Sensitivity to Audiovisual Temporal Asynchrony in Children With a History of Specific Language Impairment and Their Peers With Typical Development: A Replication and Follow-Up Study Purpose Earlier, my colleagues and I showed that children with a history of specific language impairment (H-SLI) are significantly less able to detect audiovisual asynchrony compared with children with typical development (TD; Kaganovich & Schumaker, 2014). Here, I first replicate this finding in a new group of children with H-SLI ... Research Note
Newly Published
Research Note  |   July 13, 2017
Sensitivity to Audiovisual Temporal Asynchrony in Children With a History of Specific Language Impairment and Their Peers With Typical Development: A Replication and Follow-Up Study
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Natalya Kaganovich
    Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
    Department of Psychological Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Natalya Kaganovich: kaganovi@purdue.edu
  • Editor: Sean Redmond
    Editor: Sean Redmond×
  • Associate Editor: Lisa Archibald
    Associate Editor: Lisa Archibald×
Article Information
Development / Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Newly Published / Research Note
Research Note   |   July 13, 2017
Sensitivity to Audiovisual Temporal Asynchrony in Children With a History of Specific Language Impairment and Their Peers With Typical Development: A Replication and Follow-Up Study
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-L-16-0327
History: Received August 10, 2016 , Revised January 26, 2017 , Accepted April 5, 2017
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-L-16-0327
History: Received August 10, 2016; Revised January 26, 2017; Accepted April 5, 2017

Purpose Earlier, my colleagues and I showed that children with a history of specific language impairment (H-SLI) are significantly less able to detect audiovisual asynchrony compared with children with typical development (TD; Kaganovich & Schumaker, 2014). Here, I first replicate this finding in a new group of children with H-SLI and TD and then examine a relationship among audiovisual function, attention skills, and language in a combined pool of children.

Method The stimuli were a pure tone and an explosion-shaped figure. Stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) varied from 0–500 ms. Children pressed 1 button for perceived synchrony and another for asynchrony. I measured the number of synchronous perceptions at each SOA and calculated children's temporal binding windows. I, then, conducted multiple regressions to determine if audiovisual processing and attention can predict language skills.

Results As in the earlier study, children with H-SLI perceived asynchrony significantly less frequently than children with TD at SOAs of 400–500 ms. Their temporal binding windows were also larger. Temporal precision and attention predicted 23%–37% of children's language ability.

Conclusions Audiovisual temporal processing is impaired in children with H-SLI. The degree of this impairment is a predictor of language skills. Once understood, the mechanisms underlying this deficit may become a new focus for language remediation.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported, in part, by Grant R03DC013151 awarded to Natalya Kaganovich by the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health. The content is solely the responsibility of the author and does not necessarily represent the official view of the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communicative Disorders or the National Institutes of Health. I am grateful to Jennifer Schumaker, Patricia Deevy, Courtney Rowland Gorbandt, Kevin Barlow, and Caryn Herring for help with various stages of this project.
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