Effects of Lexical and Somatosensory Feedback on Long-Term Improvements in Intelligibility of Dysarthric Speech Purpose Intelligibility improvements immediately following perceptual training with dysarthric speech using lexical feedback are comparable to those observed when training uses somatosensory feedback (Borrie & Schäfer, 2015). In this study, we investigated if these lexical and somatosensory guided improvements in listener intelligibility of dysarthric speech remain comparable and stable over ... Research Article
Newly Published
Research Article  |   July 06, 2017
Effects of Lexical and Somatosensory Feedback on Long-Term Improvements in Intelligibility of Dysarthric Speech
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Stephanie A. Borrie
    Department of Communicative Disorders and Deaf Education, Utah State University, Logan
  • Martina C. M. Schäfer
    New Zealand Institute of Language, Brain and Behaviour, University of Canterbury, Christchurch
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Stephanie A. Borrie: stephanie.borrie@usu.edu
  • Editor: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Associate Editor: Kate Bunton
    Associate Editor: Kate Bunton×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Dysarthria / Newly Published / Research Article
Research Article   |   July 06, 2017
Effects of Lexical and Somatosensory Feedback on Long-Term Improvements in Intelligibility of Dysarthric Speech
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-16-0411
History: Received October 29, 2016 , Revised January 20, 2017 , Accepted February 9, 2017
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-16-0411
History: Received October 29, 2016; Revised January 20, 2017; Accepted February 9, 2017

Purpose Intelligibility improvements immediately following perceptual training with dysarthric speech using lexical feedback are comparable to those observed when training uses somatosensory feedback (Borrie & Schäfer, 2015). In this study, we investigated if these lexical and somatosensory guided improvements in listener intelligibility of dysarthric speech remain comparable and stable over the course of 1 month.

Method Following an intelligibility pretest, 60 participants were trained with dysarthric speech stimuli under one of three conditions: lexical feedback, somatosensory feedback, or no training (control). Participants then completed a series of intelligibility posttests, which took place immediately (immediate posttest), 1 week (1-week posttest) following training, and 1 month (1-month posttest) following training.

Results As per our previous study, intelligibility improvements at immediate posttest were equivalent between lexical and somatosensory feedback conditions. Condition differences, however, emerged over time. Improvements guided by lexical feedback deteriorated over the month whereas those guided by somatosensory feedback remained robust.

Conclusions Somatosensory feedback, internally generated by vocal imitation, may be required to affect long-term perceptual gain in processing dysarthric speech. Findings are discussed in relation to underlying learning mechanisms and offer insight into how externally and internally generated feedback may differentially affect perceptual learning of disordered speech.

Acknowledgments
We gratefully acknowledge Michelle Parker and Ashley Hurst, research assistants in the Human Interaction Lab at Utah State University, for assistance with data collection and transcript analysis. We also acknowledge Tyson Barret from the Utah State University Statistical Consulting Studio for providing statistical input.
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