Judgments of Emotion in Clear and Conversational Speech by Young Adults With Normal Hearing and Older Adults With Hearing Impairment Purpose In this study, we investigated the emotion perceived by young listeners with normal hearing (YNH listeners) and older adults with hearing impairment (OHI listeners) when listening to speech produced conversationally or in a clear speaking style. Method The first experiment included 18 YNH listeners, and the second ... Research Article
Newly Published
Research Article  |   July 06, 2017
Judgments of Emotion in Clear and Conversational Speech by Young Adults With Normal Hearing and Older Adults With Hearing Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Shae D. Morgan
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Utah, Salt Lake City
  • Sarah Hargus Ferguson
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Utah, Salt Lake City
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Shae D. Morgan: shae.morgan@utah.edu
  • Editor: Nancy Tye-Murray
    Editor: Nancy Tye-Murray×
  • Associate Editor: Kathleen Cienkowski
    Associate Editor: Kathleen Cienkowski×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Normal Language Processing / Newly Published / Research Article
Research Article   |   July 06, 2017
Judgments of Emotion in Clear and Conversational Speech by Young Adults With Normal Hearing and Older Adults With Hearing Impairment
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-H-16-0264
History: Received June 20, 2016 , Revised October 17, 2016 , Accepted December 6, 2016
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-H-16-0264
History: Received June 20, 2016; Revised October 17, 2016; Accepted December 6, 2016

Purpose In this study, we investigated the emotion perceived by young listeners with normal hearing (YNH listeners) and older adults with hearing impairment (OHI listeners) when listening to speech produced conversationally or in a clear speaking style.

Method The first experiment included 18 YNH listeners, and the second included 10 additional YNH listeners along with 20 OHI listeners. Participants heard sentences spoken conversationally and clearly. Participants selected the emotion they heard in the talker's voice using a 6-alternative, forced-choice paradigm.

Results Clear speech was judged as sounding angry and disgusted more often and happy, fearful, sad, and neutral less often than conversational speech. Talkers whose clear speech was judged to be particularly clear were also judged as sounding angry more often and fearful less often than other talkers. OHI listeners reported hearing anger less often than YNH listeners; however, they still judged clear speech as angry more often than conversational speech.

Conclusions Speech spoken clearly may sound angry more often than speech spoken conversationally. Although perceived emotion varied between YNH and OHI listeners, judgments of anger were higher for clear speech than conversational speech for both listener groups.

Supplemental Materials https://doi.org/10.23641/asha.5170717

Acknowledgments
This research was supported in part by National Institutes of Health Grant R01DC012315 to Eric Hunter. Development of the Ferguson Clear Speech Database was supported by National Institutes of Health Grant DC02229 to Diane Kewley-Port. Portions of these results were presented at the 169th meeting of the Acoustical Society of America and the 2015 annual meeting of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. A special thanks to Joan Morgan and Jaime Booz for their suggestions and comments on previous versions of this article.
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