Stability of the Cortical Sensory Waveforms, the P1-N1-P2 Complex and T-Complex, of Auditory Evoked Potentials Purpose Atypical cortical sensory waveforms reflecting impaired encoding of auditory stimuli may result from inconsistency in cortical response to the acoustic feature changes within spoken words. Thus, the present study assessed intrasubject stability of the P1-N1-P2 complex and T-complex to multiple productions of spoken nonwords in 48 adults to provide ... Research Article
Research Article  |   July 12, 2017
Stability of the Cortical Sensory Waveforms, the P1-N1-P2 Complex and T-Complex, of Auditory Evoked Potentials
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Monica Wagner
    St. John's University, Queens, New York
  • Valerie L. Shafer
    The Graduate Center of the City University of New York
  • Evis Haxhari
    St. John's University, Queens, New York
  • Kevin Kiprovski
    St. John's University, Queens, New York
  • Katherine Behrmann
    St. John's University, Queens, New York
  • Tara Griffiths
    St. John's University, Queens, New York
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Monica Wagner: wagnerm@stjohns.edu
  • Editor: Frederick Gallun
    Editor: Frederick Gallun×
  • Associate Editor: Suzanne Purdy
    Associate Editor: Suzanne Purdy×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Hearing Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   July 12, 2017
Stability of the Cortical Sensory Waveforms, the P1-N1-P2 Complex and T-Complex, of Auditory Evoked Potentials
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, July 2017, Vol. 60, 2105-2115. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-H-16-0056
History: Received February 15, 2016 , Revised July 18, 2016 , Accepted February 21, 2017
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, July 2017, Vol. 60, 2105-2115. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-H-16-0056
History: Received February 15, 2016; Revised July 18, 2016; Accepted February 21, 2017

Purpose Atypical cortical sensory waveforms reflecting impaired encoding of auditory stimuli may result from inconsistency in cortical response to the acoustic feature changes within spoken words. Thus, the present study assessed intrasubject stability of the P1-N1-P2 complex and T-complex to multiple productions of spoken nonwords in 48 adults to provide benchmarks for future studies probing auditory processing deficits.

Method Response trials were split (split epoch averages) for each of 4 word types for each subject and compared for similarity in waveform morphology. Waveform morphology association was assessed between 50 and 600 ms, the time frame reflecting spectro-temporal feature processing for the stimuli used in the study.

Results Using approximately 70 trials in each split epoch, the P1-N1-P2 complex was found to be highly stable, with high positive associations found for all subjects for at least 3 word types. The T-complex was more variable, with high positive associations found for all subjects to at least 1 word type.

Conclusions The P1-N1-P2 split epochs at group and individual levels and the T-complex at group level can be used to assess consistency of neural response in individuals with auditory processing deficits. The T-complex relative to the P1-N1-P2 complex in individuals can provide information pertaining to phonological processing.

Acknowledgments
This article was partially supported by a grant from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to Valerie Shafer (Grant HD-46193). The contents of this work are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of NIH. We acknowledge Gary Chant, Caitlin Shea, Colleen O'Brien, and Francesca Mingino for providing assistance on this project. We are grateful to the reviewers and editors for providing excellent suggestions.
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