Polysyllable Speech Accuracy and Predictors of Later Literacy Development in Preschool Children With Speech Sound Disorders Purpose The aim of this study was to determine if polysyllable accuracy in preschoolers with speech sound disorders (SSD) was related to known predictors of later literacy development: phonological processing, receptive vocabulary, and print knowledge. Polysyllables—words of three or more syllables—are important to consider because unlike monosyllables, polysyllables have been ... Research Article
Research Article  |   July 12, 2017
Polysyllable Speech Accuracy and Predictors of Later Literacy Development in Preschool Children With Speech Sound Disorders
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sarah Masso
    Charles Sturt University, Sydney, Australia
  • Elise Baker
    The University of Sydney, Lidcombe, Australia
  • Sharynne McLeod
    Charles Sturt University, Bathurst, Australia
  • Cen Wang
    Charles Sturt University, Bathurst, Australia
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Sarah Masso: smasso@csu.edu.au
  • Editor: Julie Liss
    Editor: Julie Liss×
  • Associate Editor: Tanya Eadie
    Associate Editor: Tanya Eadie×
Article Information
Development / Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Normal Language Processing / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   July 12, 2017
Polysyllable Speech Accuracy and Predictors of Later Literacy Development in Preschool Children With Speech Sound Disorders
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, July 2017, Vol. 60, 1877-1890. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-16-0171
History: Received April 29, 2016 , Revised November 19, 2016 , Accepted February 13, 2017
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, July 2017, Vol. 60, 1877-1890. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-16-0171
History: Received April 29, 2016; Revised November 19, 2016; Accepted February 13, 2017

Purpose The aim of this study was to determine if polysyllable accuracy in preschoolers with speech sound disorders (SSD) was related to known predictors of later literacy development: phonological processing, receptive vocabulary, and print knowledge. Polysyllables—words of three or more syllables—are important to consider because unlike monosyllables, polysyllables have been associated with phonological processing and literacy difficulties in school-aged children. They therefore have the potential to help identify preschoolers most at risk of future literacy difficulties.

Method Participants were 93 preschool children with SSD from the Sound Start Study. Participants completed the Polysyllable Preschool Test (Baker, 2013) as well as phonological processing, receptive vocabulary, and print knowledge tasks.

Results Cluster analysis was completed, and 2 clusters were identified: low polysyllable accuracy and moderate polysyllable accuracy. The clusters were significantly different based on 2 measures of phonological awareness and measures of receptive vocabulary, rapid naming, and digit span. The clusters were not significantly different on sound matching accuracy or letter, sound, or print concept knowledge.

Conclusions The participants' poor performance on print knowledge tasks suggested that as a group, they were at risk of literacy difficulties but that there was a cluster of participants at greater risk—those with both low polysyllable accuracy and poor phonological processing.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by Australian Research Council Discovery Grant DP130102545 awarded to the second and third authors. The first author acknowledges support from an Australian postgraduate award scholarship from the Australian Department of Education. The authors thank Kate Crowe, Charlotte Howland, and Felicity McKellar for providing support with data collection and entry.
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