Video Game Rehabilitation of Velopharyngeal Dysfunction: A Case Series Purpose Video games provide a promising platform for rehabilitation of speech disorders. Although video games have been used to train speech perception in foreign language learners and have been proposed for aural rehabilitation, their use in speech therapy has been limited thus far. We present feasibility results from at-home use ... Technical Report
Technical Report  |   June 22, 2017
Video Game Rehabilitation of Velopharyngeal Dysfunction: A Case Series
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Gabriel J. Cler
    Graduate Program for Neuroscience–Computational Neuroscience, Boston University, MA
    Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Boston University, MA
  • Talia Mittelman
    Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Boston University, MA
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, Boston University, MA
  • Maia N. Braden
    Department of Surgery, Division of Otolaryngology, Voice and Swallow Clinics, University of Wisconsin, Madison
  • Geralyn Harvey Woodnorth
    Speech-Language Pathology Program, Otolaryngology and Communication Enhancement, Boston Children's Hospital, MA
  • Cara E. Stepp
    Graduate Program for Neuroscience–Computational Neuroscience, Boston University, MA
    Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Boston University, MA
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, Boston University, MA
    Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Boston University School of Medicine, MA
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Gabriel J. Cler: mcler@bu.edu
  • Editor: Yana Yunusova
    Editor: Yana Yunusova×
  • Associate Editor: Deryk Beal
    Associate Editor: Deryk Beal×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Special Issue: Selected Papers From the 2016 Conference on Motor Speech—Basic and Clinical Science and Technology / Technical Reports
Technical Report   |   June 22, 2017
Video Game Rehabilitation of Velopharyngeal Dysfunction: A Case Series
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2017, Vol. 60, 1800-1809. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-16-0231
History: Received June 14, 2016 , Revised October 12, 2016 , Accepted November 22, 2016
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2017, Vol. 60, 1800-1809. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-16-0231
History: Received June 14, 2016; Revised October 12, 2016; Accepted November 22, 2016

Purpose Video games provide a promising platform for rehabilitation of speech disorders. Although video games have been used to train speech perception in foreign language learners and have been proposed for aural rehabilitation, their use in speech therapy has been limited thus far. We present feasibility results from at-home use in a case series of children with velopharyngeal dysfunction (VPD) using an interactive video game that provided real-time biofeedback to facilitate appropriate nasalization.

Method Five participants were recruited across a range of ages, VPD severities, and VPD etiologies. Participants completed multiple weeks of individual game play with a video game that provides feedback on nasalization measured via nasal accelerometry. Nasalization was assessed before and after training by using nasometry, aerodynamic measures, and expert perceptual judgments.

Results Four participants used the game at home or school, with the remaining participant unwilling to have the nasal accelerometer secured to his nasal skin, perhaps due to his young age. The remaining participants showed a tendency toward decreased nasalization after training, particularly for the words explicitly trained in the video game.

Conclusion Results suggest that video game–based systems may provide a useful rehabilitation platform for providing real-time feedback of speech nasalization in VPD.

Supplemental Material https://doi.org/10.23641/asha.5116828

Acknowledgments
Thanks to Elizabeth Heller Murray, Danielle Sturgeon, and Delsys, Inc., for their support and to Dave Anderson, Andrew Brughera, Will Cunningham, Ran Gong, and Jake Hermann for their development work. This work was supported, in part, by the Diane M. Bless Endowed Chair, Division of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery at University of Wisconsin, Madison (awarded to M. Braden) and National Institutes of Health Grant DC014872 (awarded to G. Cler).
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