Initial Observations of Lingual Movement Characteristics of Children With Cerebral Palsy Purpose This preliminary study compared the speech motor control of the tongue and jaw between children with cerebral palsy (CP) and their typically developing (TD) peers. Method Tongue tip and jaw movements of 4 boys with spastic CP and 4 age- and sex-matched TD peers were recorded using ... Research Note
Research Note  |   June 22, 2017
Initial Observations of Lingual Movement Characteristics of Children With Cerebral Palsy
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ignatius S. B. Nip
    School of Speech, Language, & Hearing Sciences, San Diego State University, CA
  • Carlos R. Arias
    School of Speech, Language, & Hearing Sciences, San Diego State University, CA
  • Kristen Morita
    School of Speech, Language, & Hearing Sciences, San Diego State University, CA
  • Hannah Richardson
    School of Speech, Language, & Hearing Sciences, San Diego State University, CA
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Ignatius Nip: inip@mail.sdsu.edu
  • Editor: Yana Yunusova
    Editor: Yana Yunusova×
  • Associate Editor: Deryk Beal
    Associate Editor: Deryk Beal×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Special Issue: Selected Papers From the 2016 Conference on Motor Speech—Basic and Clinical Science and Technology / Research Notes
Research Note   |   June 22, 2017
Initial Observations of Lingual Movement Characteristics of Children With Cerebral Palsy
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2017, Vol. 60, 1780-1790. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-16-0239
History: Received June 14, 2016 , Revised October 24, 2016 , Accepted November 29, 2016
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2017, Vol. 60, 1780-1790. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-16-0239
History: Received June 14, 2016; Revised October 24, 2016; Accepted November 29, 2016

Purpose This preliminary study compared the speech motor control of the tongue and jaw between children with cerebral palsy (CP) and their typically developing (TD) peers.

Method Tongue tip and jaw movements of 4 boys with spastic CP and 4 age- and sex-matched TD peers were recorded using an electromagnetic articulograph during 10 repetitions of “Dad told stories today.” The duration, path distance, average speed, and speech movement stability of the movements were calculated for each repetition.

Results The children with CP had longer durations than their TD peers. Children with CP had longer path distances and faster average speed as compared with their TD peers for both articulators. The TD group but not the CP group had longer path distances and faster average speeds for the tongue than the jaw. The CP group had reduced speech movement stability for the tongue as compared with their TD peers, but both groups had similar speech movement stability for the jaw.

Conclusions Children with CP had impaired speech motor control of the tongue and jaw as compared with their TD peers, and these speech motor control deficits were more pronounced in the tongue tip than the jaw.

Acknowledgments
This study was funded by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant R03 DC012135 awarded to the first author and the San Diego State University Summer Undergraduate Research Program awarded to the first and second authors. We would like to thank the participants and their families, as well as Katherine Bristow, Casey Hine, Matthew Gutierrez, Lindsay Kempf, Taylor Kubo, Alison Lebenbaum, Jordan Mantel, Cara Nutt, and Tatiana Zozulya for their assistance with data collection and data analysis. We would also like to thank Erin Wilson for her comments and suggestions.
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