Acoustic and Perceptual Consequences of Speech Cues for Children With Dysarthria Purpose Reductions in articulatory working space and vocal intensity have been linked to intelligibility deficits in children with dysarthria due to cerebral palsy. However, few studies have examined the outcomes of behavioral treatments aimed at these underlying impairments or investigated which treatment cues might best facilitate improved intelligibility. This study ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 22, 2017
Acoustic and Perceptual Consequences of Speech Cues for Children With Dysarthria
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Erika S. Levy
    Department of Communication Sciences & Disorders, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York
  • Younghwa M. Chang
    Department of Communication Sciences & Disorders, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York
  • Joséphine A. Ancelle
    Department of Communication Sciences & Disorders, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York
  • Megan J. McAuliffe
    Department of Communication Disorders and New Zealand Institute of Language, Brain and Behaviour, University of Canterbury, Christchurch
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Erika S. Levy: elevy@tc.columbia.edu
  • Editor: Yana Yunusova
    Editor: Yana Yunusova×
  • Associate Editor: Adam Buchwald
    Associate Editor: Adam Buchwald×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Dysarthria / Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Special Issue: Selected Papers From the 2016 Conference on Motor Speech—Basic and Clinical Science and Technology / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 22, 2017
Acoustic and Perceptual Consequences of Speech Cues for Children With Dysarthria
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2017, Vol. 60, 1766-1779. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-16-0274
History: Received June 28, 2016 , Revised September 16, 2016 , Accepted January 9, 2017
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2017, Vol. 60, 1766-1779. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-16-0274
History: Received June 28, 2016; Revised September 16, 2016; Accepted January 9, 2017

Purpose Reductions in articulatory working space and vocal intensity have been linked to intelligibility deficits in children with dysarthria due to cerebral palsy. However, few studies have examined the outcomes of behavioral treatments aimed at these underlying impairments or investigated which treatment cues might best facilitate improved intelligibility. This study assessed the effects of cues targeting clear speech (i.e., “Speak with your big mouth”) and greater vocal intensity (i.e., “Speak with your strong voice”) on acoustic measures of speech production and intelligibility.

Method Eight children with spastic dysarthria due to cerebral palsy repeated sentence- and word-level stimuli across habitual, big mouth, and strong voice conditions. Acoustic analyses were conducted, and 48 listeners completed orthographic transcription and scaled intelligibility ratings.

Results Both cues resulted in significant changes to vocal intensity and speech rate although the degree of change varied by condition. In a similar manner, perceptual analysis revealed significant improvements to intelligibility with both cues; however, at the single-word level, big mouth outperformed strong voice.

Conclusion Children with dysarthria are capable of changing their speech styles differentially in response to cueing. Both the big mouth and strong voice cues hold promise as intervention strategies to improve intelligibility in this population.

Supplemental Material https://doi.org/10.23641/asha.5116843

Acknowledgments
Thank you to the participants, their families, as well as to Ernest Chang, Renée Deschenes, Sarah Eldib, Robert Fromont, Andrew Gordon, Bethany Hetrick, Hsing-Ching Kuo, Sarya Majdalani, and Bhavini Surana.
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