Effects of Blocked and Random Practice Schedule on Outcomes of Sound Production Treatment for Acquired Apraxia of Speech: Results of a Group Investigation Purpose The purpose of this investigation was to compare the effects of schedule of practice (i.e., blocked vs. random) on outcomes of Sound Production Treatment (SPT; Wambaugh, Kalinyak-Fliszar, West, & Doyle, 1998) for speakers with chronic acquired apraxia of speech and aphasia. Method A combination of group and ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 22, 2017
Effects of Blocked and Random Practice Schedule on Outcomes of Sound Production Treatment for Acquired Apraxia of Speech: Results of a Group Investigation
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Julie L. Wambaugh
    VA Salt Lake City Health Care System, Utah
    University of Utah, Salt Lake City
  • Christina Nessler
    VA Salt Lake City Health Care System, Utah
  • Sandra Wright
    VA Salt Lake City Health Care System, Utah
  • Shannon C. Mauszycki
    VA Salt Lake City Health Care System, Utah
    University of Utah, Salt Lake City
  • Catharine DeLong
    VA Salt Lake City Health Care System, Utah
    University of Utah, Salt Lake City
  • Kiera Berggren
    VA Salt Lake City Health Care System, Utah
    University of Utah, Salt Lake City
  • Dallin J. Bailey
    VA Salt Lake City Health Care System, Utah
    University of Utah, Salt Lake City
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Julie L. Wambaugh: julie.wambaugh@health.utah.edu
  • Editor: Yana Yunusova
    Editor: Yana Yunusova×
  • Associate Editor: Adam Buchwald
    Associate Editor: Adam Buchwald×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Apraxia of Speech & Childhood Apraxia of Speech / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Special Issue: Selected Papers From the 2016 Conference on Motor Speech—Basic and Clinical Science and Technology / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 22, 2017
Effects of Blocked and Random Practice Schedule on Outcomes of Sound Production Treatment for Acquired Apraxia of Speech: Results of a Group Investigation
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2017, Vol. 60, 1739-1751. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-16-0249
History: Received June 15, 2016 , Revised September 19, 2016 , Accepted November 29, 2016
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2017, Vol. 60, 1739-1751. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-16-0249
History: Received June 15, 2016; Revised September 19, 2016; Accepted November 29, 2016

Purpose The purpose of this investigation was to compare the effects of schedule of practice (i.e., blocked vs. random) on outcomes of Sound Production Treatment (SPT; Wambaugh, Kalinyak-Fliszar, West, & Doyle, 1998) for speakers with chronic acquired apraxia of speech and aphasia.

Method A combination of group and single-case experimental designs was used. Twenty participants each received SPT administered with randomized stimuli presentation (SPT-R) and SPT applied with blocked stimuli presentation (SPT-B). Treatment effects were examined with respect to accuracy of articulation as measured in treated and untreated experimental words produced during probes.

Results All participants demonstrated improved articulation of treated items with both practice schedules. Effect sizes were calculated to estimate magnitude of change for treated and untreated items by treatment condition. No significant differences were found for SPT-R and SPT-B relative to effect size. Percent change over the highest baseline performance was also calculated to provide a clinically relevant indication of improvement. Change scores associated with SPT-R were significantly higher than those for SPT-B for treated items but not untreated items.

Conclusion SPT can result in improved articulation regardless of schedule of practice. However, SPT-R may result in greater gains for treated items.

Supplemental Materials https://doi.org/10.23641/asha.5116831

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by VA Rehabilitation R&D Merit Review Project RX000363-01A1 (NCT01483807), Research Career Scientist Award 23727, and Career Development Award RX000749 from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Rehabilitation Research and Development Service. The contents do not represent the views of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs or the U.S. Government. NCT 01979159.
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