The Impact of Feedback Frequency on Performance in a Novel Speech Motor Learning Task Purpose This study investigated whether whole nonword accuracy, phoneme accuracy, and acoustic duration measures were influenced by the amount of feedback speakers without impairment received during a novel speech motor learning task. Method Thirty-two native English speakers completed a nonword production task across 3 time points: practice, short-term ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 22, 2017
The Impact of Feedback Frequency on Performance in a Novel Speech Motor Learning Task
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mara Steinberg Lowe
    New York University
  • Adam Buchwald
    New York University
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Mara Steinberg Lowe: marasteinberglowe@nyu.edu
  • Editor: Yana Yunusova
    Editor: Yana Yunusova×
  • Associate Editor: Ignatius Nip
    Associate Editor: Ignatius Nip×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Special Issue: Selected Papers From the 2016 Conference on Motor Speech—Basic and Clinical Science and Technology / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 22, 2017
The Impact of Feedback Frequency on Performance in a Novel Speech Motor Learning Task
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2017, Vol. 60, 1712-1725. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-16-0207
History: Received May 26, 2016 , Revised September 27, 2016 , Accepted November 17, 2016
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2017, Vol. 60, 1712-1725. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-16-0207
History: Received May 26, 2016; Revised September 27, 2016; Accepted November 17, 2016

Purpose This study investigated whether whole nonword accuracy, phoneme accuracy, and acoustic duration measures were influenced by the amount of feedback speakers without impairment received during a novel speech motor learning task.

Method Thirty-two native English speakers completed a nonword production task across 3 time points: practice, short-term retention, and long-term retention. During practice, participants received knowledge of results feedback according to a randomly assigned schedule (100%, 50%, 20%, or 0%). Changes in nonword accuracy, phoneme accuracy, nonword duration, and initial-cluster duration were compared among feedback groups, sessions, and stimulus properties.

Results All participants improved phoneme and whole nonword accuracy at short-term and long-term retention time points. Participants also refined productions of nonwords, as indicated by a decrease in nonword duration across sessions. The 50% group exhibited the largest reduction in duration between practice and long-term retention for nonwords with native and nonnative clusters.

Conclusions All speakers, regardless of feedback schedule, learned new speech motor behaviors quickly with a high degree of accuracy and refined their speech motor skills for perceptually accurate productions. Acoustic measurements may capture more subtle, subperceptual changes that may occur during speech motor learning.

Supplemental Materials https://doi.org/10.23641/asha.5116324

Acknowledgments
The research and preparation of this article was supported by grants from the New York University–University Research Challenge Fund and National Institutes of Health Grant K01DC014298 to Adam Buchwald. The authors would like to thank Maria Grigos, Tara McAllister Byun, and Susannah Levi for their input on the study design and analyses; Kelly Karpus, Holly Jane Wilde Calhoun, Jonathon Boyd, and Sarah Kastner-Ziemann for help with data analysis; and Stacey Rimikis for help with statistical analyses.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access