Visual Cues Contribute Differentially to Audiovisual Perception of Consonants and Vowels in Improving Recognition and Reducing Cognitive Demands in Listeners With Hearing Impairment Using Hearing Aids Purpose We sought to examine the contribution of visual cues in audiovisual identification of consonants and vowels—in terms of isolation points (the shortest time required for correct identification of a speech stimulus), accuracy, and cognitive demands—in listeners with hearing impairment using hearing aids. Method The study comprised 199 ... Research Article
Newly Published
Research Article  |   June 23, 2017
Visual Cues Contribute Differentially to Audiovisual Perception of Consonants and Vowels in Improving Recognition and Reducing Cognitive Demands in Listeners With Hearing Impairment Using Hearing Aids
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Shahram Moradi
    Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Department of Behavioral Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Sweden
  • Björn Lidestam
    Department of Behavioral Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Sweden
  • Henrik Danielsson
    Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Department of Behavioral Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Sweden
  • Elaine Hoi Ning Ng
    Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Department of Behavioral Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Sweden
  • Jerker Rönnberg
    Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Department of Behavioral Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Sweden
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Shahram Moradi: shahram.moradi@liu.se
  • Editor: Nancy Tye-Murray
    Editor: Nancy Tye-Murray×
  • Associate Editor: Karen Kirk
    Associate Editor: Karen Kirk×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Newly Published / Research Article
Research Article   |   June 23, 2017
Visual Cues Contribute Differentially to Audiovisual Perception of Consonants and Vowels in Improving Recognition and Reducing Cognitive Demands in Listeners With Hearing Impairment Using Hearing Aids
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-H-16-0160
History: Received April 19, 2016 , Revised August 30, 2016 , Accepted December 19, 2016
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-H-16-0160
History: Received April 19, 2016; Revised August 30, 2016; Accepted December 19, 2016

Purpose We sought to examine the contribution of visual cues in audiovisual identification of consonants and vowels—in terms of isolation points (the shortest time required for correct identification of a speech stimulus), accuracy, and cognitive demands—in listeners with hearing impairment using hearing aids.

Method The study comprised 199 participants with hearing impairment (mean age = 61.1 years) with bilateral, symmetrical, mild-to-severe sensorineural hearing loss. Gated Swedish consonants and vowels were presented aurally and audiovisually to participants. Linear amplification was adjusted for each participant to assure audibility. The reading span test was used to measure participants' working memory capacity.

Results Audiovisual presentation resulted in shortened isolation points and improved accuracy for consonants and vowels relative to auditory-only presentation. This benefit was more evident for consonants than vowels. In addition, correlations and subsequent analyses revealed that listeners with higher scores on the reading span test identified both consonants and vowels earlier in auditory-only presentation, but only vowels (not consonants) in audiovisual presentation.

Conclusion Consonants and vowels differed in terms of the benefits afforded from their associative visual cues, as indicated by the degree of audiovisual benefit and reduction in cognitive demands linked to the identification of consonants and vowels presented audiovisually.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by a grant from the Swedish Research Council (awarded to Jerker Rönnberg) and a program grant from the Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life, and Welfare (awarded to Jerker Rönnberg). We thank Tomas Bjuvmar, Helena Torlofson, and Wycliffe Yumba, who assisted in collecting data, and Mathias Hällgren for his technical support.
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