Factors Associated With Communicative Participation in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Purpose People with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis frequently experience bulbar impairment and dysarthria that may restrict their ability to take part in everyday communication situations. The aim of this study is to examine selected variables that may contribute to restrictions in communicative participation. Method Community-dwelling participants with amyotrophic lateral ... Research Note
Research Note  |   June 22, 2017
Factors Associated With Communicative Participation in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kathryn Yorkston
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Carolyn Baylor
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Helen Mach
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Kathryn Yorkston: yorkston@u.washington.edu
  • Editor: Yana Yunusova
    Editor: Yana Yunusova×
  • Associate Editor: Adam Buchwald
    Associate Editor: Adam Buchwald×
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Special Populations / Special Issue: Selected Papers From the 2016 Conference on Motor Speech—Basic and Clinical Science and Technology / Research Notes
Research Note   |   June 22, 2017
Factors Associated With Communicative Participation in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2017, Vol. 60, 1791-1797. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-16-0206
History: Received May 26, 2016 , Revised September 13, 2016 , Accepted December 16, 2016
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2017, Vol. 60, 1791-1797. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-16-0206
History: Received May 26, 2016; Revised September 13, 2016; Accepted December 16, 2016

Purpose People with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis frequently experience bulbar impairment and dysarthria that may restrict their ability to take part in everyday communication situations. The aim of this study is to examine selected variables that may contribute to restrictions in communicative participation.

Method Community-dwelling participants with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (N = 70) who reported communication changes but continued to use natural speech completed a survey, including the Communicative Participation Item Bank, demographics (age, sex, living situation, employment status, education, and time since diagnosis), and self- reported symptom-related variables (physical activity, emotional problems, fatigue, pain, speech severity, speech usage, and cognitive and communication skills). To identify predictors of restrictions in communicative participation, these variables were entered into a backward stepwise multiple linear regression analysis.

Results Three variables (speech severity, swallowing severity, and speech usage) were included in the final model and accounted for 55% of the variability.

Conclusions Better speech and swallowing skills and higher speech usage are associated with better communicative participation in this sample. Thus, when making clinical decisions regarding intervention, clinicians should continue their efforts to target speech and swallow abilities, while recognizing other variables that have the potential of restricting communicative participation.

Acknowledgment
This research was supported by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant R03DC0 10044 (awarded to C. Baylor).
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