Speech Motor Sequence Learning: Effect of Parkinson Disease and Normal Aging on Dual-Task Performance Purpose Everyday communication is carried out concurrently with other tasks. Therefore, determining how dual tasks interfere with newly learned speech motor skills can offer insight into the cognitive mechanisms underlying speech motor learning in Parkinson disease (PD). The current investigation examines a recently learned speech motor sequence under dual-task conditions. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 22, 2017
Speech Motor Sequence Learning: Effect of Parkinson Disease and Normal Aging on Dual-Task Performance
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jason A. Whitfield
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Bowling Green State University, OH
  • Alexander M. Goberman
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Bowling Green State University, OH
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Jason A. Whitfield: jawhitf@bgsu.edu
  • Editor: Yana Yunusova
    Editor: Yana Yunusova×
  • Associate Editor: Kristie Spencer
    Associate Editor: Kristie Spencer×
Article Information
Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Special Issue: Selected Papers From the 2016 Conference on Motor Speech—Basic and Clinical Science and Technology / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 22, 2017
Speech Motor Sequence Learning: Effect of Parkinson Disease and Normal Aging on Dual-Task Performance
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2017, Vol. 60, 1752-1765. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-16-0246
History: Received June 15, 2016 , Revised September 16, 2016 , Accepted November 29, 2016
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2017, Vol. 60, 1752-1765. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-16-0246
History: Received June 15, 2016; Revised September 16, 2016; Accepted November 29, 2016

Purpose Everyday communication is carried out concurrently with other tasks. Therefore, determining how dual tasks interfere with newly learned speech motor skills can offer insight into the cognitive mechanisms underlying speech motor learning in Parkinson disease (PD). The current investigation examines a recently learned speech motor sequence under dual-task conditions.

Method A previously learned sequence of 6 monosyllabic nonwords was examined using a dual-task paradigm. Participants repeated the sequence while concurrently performing a visuomotor task, and performance on both tasks was measured in single- and dual-task conditions.

Results The younger adult group exhibited little to no dual-task interference on the accuracy and duration of the sequence. The older adult group exhibited variability in dual-task costs, with the group as a whole exhibiting an intermediate, though significant, amount of dual-task interference. The PD group exhibited the largest degree of bidirectional dual-task interference among all the groups.

Conclusions These data suggest that PD affects the later stages of speech motor learning, as the dual-task condition interfered with production of the recently learned sequence beyond the effect of normal aging. Because the basal ganglia is critical for the later stages of motor sequence learning, the observed deficits may result from the underlying neural dysfunction associated with PD.

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