Kinematic Analysis of Speech Sound Sequencing Errors Induced by Delayed Auditory Feedback Purpose Delayed auditory feedback (DAF) causes speakers to become disfluent and make phonological errors. Methods for assessing the kinematics of speech errors are lacking, with most DAF studies relying on auditory perceptual analyses, which may be problematic, as errors judged to be categorical may actually represent blends of sounds or ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 22, 2017
Kinematic Analysis of Speech Sound Sequencing Errors Induced by Delayed Auditory Feedback
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Gabriel J. Cler
    Graduate Program for Neuroscience–Computational Neuroscience, Boston University, MA
    Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Boston University, MA
  • Jackson C. Lee
    Department of Health Sciences, Boston University, MA
  • Talia Mittelman
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, Boston University, MA
  • Cara E. Stepp
    Graduate Program for Neuroscience–Computational Neuroscience, Boston University, MA
    Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Boston University, MA
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, Boston University, MA
    School of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Boston University, MA
  • Jason W. Bohland
    Graduate Program for Neuroscience–Computational Neuroscience, Boston University, MA
    Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Boston University, MA
    Department of Health Sciences, Boston University, MA
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Gabriel J. Cler: mcler@bu.edu
  • Editor: Yana Yunusova
    Editor: Yana Yunusova×
  • Associate Editor: Jeffrey Berry
    Associate Editor: Jeffrey Berry×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Special Issue: Selected Papers From the 2016 Conference on Motor Speech—Basic and Clinical Science and Technology / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 22, 2017
Kinematic Analysis of Speech Sound Sequencing Errors Induced by Delayed Auditory Feedback
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2017, Vol. 60, 1695-1711. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-16-0234
History: Received June 14, 2016 , Revised October 7, 2016 , Accepted November 16, 2016
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2017, Vol. 60, 1695-1711. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-16-0234
History: Received June 14, 2016; Revised October 7, 2016; Accepted November 16, 2016

Purpose Delayed auditory feedback (DAF) causes speakers to become disfluent and make phonological errors. Methods for assessing the kinematics of speech errors are lacking, with most DAF studies relying on auditory perceptual analyses, which may be problematic, as errors judged to be categorical may actually represent blends of sounds or articulatory errors.

Method Eight typical speakers produced nonsense syllable sequences under normal and DAF (200 ms). Lip and tongue kinematics were captured with electromagnetic articulography. Time-locked acoustic recordings were transcribed, and the kinematics of utterances with and without perceived errors were analyzed with existing and novel quantitative methods.

Results New multivariate measures showed that for 5 participants, kinematic variability for productions perceived to be error free was significantly increased under delay; these results were validated by using the spatiotemporal index measure. Analysis of error trials revealed both typical productions of a nontarget syllable and productions with articulatory kinematics that incorporated aspects of both the target and the perceived utterance.

Conclusions This study is among the first to characterize articulatory changes under DAF and provides evidence for different classes of speech errors, which may not be perceptually salient. New methods were developed that may aid visualization and analysis of large kinematic data sets.

Supplemental Material https://doi.org/10.23641/asha.5103067

Acknowledgments
The authors thank Mark Tiede for generously sharing his scripts to filter and rereference electromagnetic articulography data, Shanqing Cai and Joe Perkell for their consultation, Jessica Malloy for her work on previous related projects and early help with this study, and Timothy Streeter for his expertise in sound calibration. This research was supported in part by National Institutes of Health Grants: T90 DA032484 (fellowship for G. Cler, grant awarded to David Mountain from NIDA), F31 DC014872 (awarded to G. Cler from NIDCD), R03 DC012651 (awarded to C. Stepp from NIDCD), and P30 DC04663 (awarded to S. Colburn from NIDCD).
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access