Relative Fundamental Frequency Distinguishes Between Phonotraumatic and Non-Phonotraumatic Vocal Hyperfunction Purpose The purpose of this article is to examine the ability of an acoustic measure, relative fundamental frequency (RFF), to distinguish between two subtypes of vocal hyperfunction (VH): phonotraumatic (PVH) and non-phonotraumatic (NPVH). Method RFF values were compared among control individuals with typical voices (N = 49), individuals ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 10, 2017
Relative Fundamental Frequency Distinguishes Between Phonotraumatic and Non-Phonotraumatic Vocal Hyperfunction
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Elizabeth S. Heller Murray
    Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Boston University, MA
  • Yu-An S. Lien
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, Boston University, MA
  • Jarrad H. Van Stan
    MGH Institute of Health Professions, Boston, MA
    Center for Laryngeal Surgery & Voice Rehabilitation, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston
    Department of Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, MA
  • Daryush D. Mehta
    MGH Institute of Health Professions, Boston, MA
    Center for Laryngeal Surgery & Voice Rehabilitation, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston
    Department of Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, MA
  • Robert E. Hillman
    MGH Institute of Health Professions, Boston, MA
    Center for Laryngeal Surgery & Voice Rehabilitation, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston
    Department of Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, MA
  • J. Pieter Noordzij
    Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Boston University, MA
    Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, Boston University School of Medicine, MA
  • Cara E. Stepp
    Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Boston University, MA
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, Boston University, MA
    Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, Boston University School of Medicine, MA
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Elizabeth S. Heller Murray: ehmurray@bu.edu
  • Editor: Julie Liss
    Editor: Julie Liss×
  • Associate Editor: Jack Jiang
    Associate Editor: Jack Jiang×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 10, 2017
Relative Fundamental Frequency Distinguishes Between Phonotraumatic and Non-Phonotraumatic Vocal Hyperfunction
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2017, Vol. 60, 1507-1515. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-S-16-0262
History: Received June 18, 2016 , Revised December 9, 2016 , Accepted December 27, 2016
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2017, Vol. 60, 1507-1515. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-S-16-0262
History: Received June 18, 2016; Revised December 9, 2016; Accepted December 27, 2016

Purpose The purpose of this article is to examine the ability of an acoustic measure, relative fundamental frequency (RFF), to distinguish between two subtypes of vocal hyperfunction (VH): phonotraumatic (PVH) and non-phonotraumatic (NPVH).

Method RFF values were compared among control individuals with typical voices (N = 49), individuals with PVH (N = 54), and individuals with NPVH (N = 35).

Results Offset Cycle 10 RFF differed significantly among all 3 groups with values progressively decreasing for controls, individuals with NPVH, and individuals with PVH. Individuals with PVH also had lower Offset Cycles 8 and 9 relative to the other 2 groups and lower RFF values for Offset Cycle 7 relative to controls. There was also a trend for lower Onset Cycle 1 RFF values for the PVH group compared with the NPVH group.

Conclusions RFF values were significantly different between controls and individuals with VH and also between the two subtypes of VH. This study adds further support to the notion that the differences between these two subsets of VH may be functional as well as structural.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant DC012651 awarded to Cara E. Stepp and Grant DC011588 awarded to Robert E. Hillman. The article's contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health. Thanks to Victoria McKenna for perceptual ratings of vocal quality; Defne Abur, Christina Stevens, Alexandria Martinson, and Laura Enflo for assistance with audio data recording; and Melissa Cooke, Amanda Fryd, and Molly Bresnahan for help with audio recording segmentation.
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