Speech-Processing Fatigue in Children: Auditory Event-Related Potential and Behavioral Measures Purpose Fatigue related to speech processing is an understudied area that may have significant negative effects, especially in children who spend the majority of their school days listening to classroom instruction. Method This study examined the feasibility of using auditory P300 responses and behavioral indices (lapses of attention ... Research Article
Newly Published
Research Article  |   June 07, 2017
Speech-Processing Fatigue in Children: Auditory Event-Related Potential and Behavioral Measures
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Alexandra P. Key
    Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences, Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN
    Vanderbilt Kennedy Center for Research on Human Development, Nashville, TN
  • Samantha J. Gustafson
    Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences, Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN
  • Lindsey Rentmeester
    Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences, Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN
  • Benjamin W. Y. Hornsby
    Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences, Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN
  • Fred H. Bess
    Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences, Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Alexandra P. Key: sasha.key@vanderbilt.edu
  • Editor: Nancy Tye-Murray
    Editor: Nancy Tye-Murray×
  • Associate Editor: Suzanne Purdy
    Associate Editor: Suzanne Purdy×
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Newly Published / Research Article
Research Article   |   June 07, 2017
Speech-Processing Fatigue in Children: Auditory Event-Related Potential and Behavioral Measures
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-H-16-0052
History: Received February 8, 2016 , Revised May 18, 2016 , Accepted December 5, 2016
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-H-16-0052
History: Received February 8, 2016; Revised May 18, 2016; Accepted December 5, 2016

Purpose Fatigue related to speech processing is an understudied area that may have significant negative effects, especially in children who spend the majority of their school days listening to classroom instruction.

Method This study examined the feasibility of using auditory P300 responses and behavioral indices (lapses of attention and self-report) to measure fatigue resulting from sustained listening demands in 27 children (M = 9.28 years).

Results Consistent with predictions, increased lapses of attention, longer reaction times, reduced P300 amplitudes to infrequent target stimuli, and self-report of greater fatigue were observed after the completion of a series of demanding listening tasks compared with the baseline values. The event-related potential responses correlated with the behavioral measures of performance.

Conclusion These findings suggest that neural and behavioral responses indexing attention and processing resources show promise as effective markers of fatigue in children.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported, in part, by Institute of Educational Sciences Grant R324A110266 to Vanderbilt University (Nashville, TN; awarded to Fred H. Bess) and National Institute of Child Health & Human Development Grants P30 HD15052 and U54 HD083211 to Vanderbilt Kennedy Center. This research was also supported by the Dan and Margaret Maddox Charitable Fund. The content expressed is that of the authors and do not necessarily represent official views of the Institute of Educational Sciences, the U.S. Department of Education, or the National Institutes of Health. Data management was supported, in part, by the Vanderbilt Institute for Clinical and Translational Research (UL1 TR000445 from National Center for Advancing Translational Services and National Institutes of Health). We thank Dorita Jones for assistance with event-related potential data processing, as well as students and study staff who assisted in participant recruitment and data collection, including Nick Bennett, Hilary Davis, Andy DeLong, Caralie Focht, Emily Fustos, Amanda Headley, Quela Royster, Amelia Schuster, Elizabeth Suba, and Krystal Werfel. Requests for reprints should be sent to Alexandra P. Key, Vanderbilt University, 230 Appleton Place, Peabody Box 74, Nashville, TN 37203; e-mail: sasha.key@vanderbilt.edu.
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