Goal-Directed Drinking Behaviors Can Be Modified Through Behavioral Mimicry Purpose This study tested whether behavioral mimicry can alter drinking behavior. It was hypothesized that participants would increase drinking behaviors given increased confederate drinking but not cup touching. Methods Nineteen healthy adults (M age = 20.32 years) completed 2 picture description tasks; during 1 task, a confederate frequently ... Research Note
Research Note  |   June 10, 2017
Goal-Directed Drinking Behaviors Can Be Modified Through Behavioral Mimicry
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Samantha E. Shune
    Communication Disorders and Sciences, University of Oregon, Eugene
  • Kayla A. Foster
    Communication Disorders and Sciences, University of Oregon, Eugene
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Samantha E. Shune: sshune@uoregon.edu
  • Editor: Julie Liss
    Editor: Julie Liss×
  • Associate Editor: Catriona Steele
    Associate Editor: Catriona Steele×
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Speech / Research Notes
Research Note   |   June 10, 2017
Goal-Directed Drinking Behaviors Can Be Modified Through Behavioral Mimicry
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2017, Vol. 60, 1535-1544. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-S-16-0328
History: Received August 12, 2016 , Revised November 9, 2016 , Accepted November 29, 2016
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2017, Vol. 60, 1535-1544. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-S-16-0328
History: Received August 12, 2016; Revised November 9, 2016; Accepted November 29, 2016

Purpose This study tested whether behavioral mimicry can alter drinking behavior. It was hypothesized that participants would increase drinking behaviors given increased confederate drinking but not cup touching.

Methods Nineteen healthy adults (M age = 20.32 years) completed 2 picture description tasks; during 1 task, a confederate frequently sipped water (complete drinking gesture), and during the other, the confederate touched her cup but did not drink (partial gesture). Outcome measures included number of drinks per minute, number of cup touches per minute, percentage of time spent drinking, and percentage of time spent touching the cup.

Results Participants spent more time drinking and had an increased drinking rate during the drinking condition versus the cup-touching condition. For a majority of participants, drinking rate increased during the drinking condition versus baseline. Drinking, but not cup touching, rate also increased given increased confederate cup touching for many.

Conclusions Mimicry likely contributes to social modeling of drinking behaviors. This effect appears more robust given a complete target gesture (full drink); however, a partial goal-directed drinking gesture may also yield a mimicked response. Beyond the theoretical implications, these results provide directions for research investigating more naturalistic mechanisms for increasing dietary intake in various patient populations (e.g., individuals with dysphagia).

Acknowledgments
We thank P. Kucheria, S. Nam, and S. Sefton for their feedback and assistance during the design and analysis of this study. Portions of this work were presented as a poster at the Oregon Speech-Language & Hearing Association's Annual Conference (October 2015).
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