Evidence for Auditory-Motor Impairment in Individuals With Hyperfunctional Voice Disorders Purpose The vocal auditory-motor control of individuals with hyperfunctional voice disorders was examined using a sensorimotor adaptation paradigm. Method Nine individuals with hyperfunctional voice disorders and 9 individuals with typical voices produced sustained vowels over 160 trials in 2 separate conditions: (a) while experiencing gradual upward perturbations in ... Research Note
Research Note  |   June 10, 2017
Evidence for Auditory-Motor Impairment in Individuals With Hyperfunctional Voice Disorders
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Cara E. Stepp
    Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Boston University, Massachusetts
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, Boston University, Massachusetts
    Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Boston University School of Medicine, Massachusetts
  • Rosemary A. Lester-Smith
    Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Boston University, Massachusetts
  • Defne Abur
    Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Boston University, Massachusetts
  • Ayoub Daliri
    Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Boston University, Massachusetts
  • J. Pieter Noordzij
    Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Boston University, Massachusetts
    Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Boston University School of Medicine, Massachusetts
  • Ashling A. Lupiani
    Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Boston University, Massachusetts
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to: Cara E. Stepp: cstepp@bu.edu
  • Editor: Julie Liss
    Editor: Julie Liss×
  • Associate Editor: Jack Jiang
    Associate Editor: Jack Jiang×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Notes
Research Note   |   June 10, 2017
Evidence for Auditory-Motor Impairment in Individuals With Hyperfunctional Voice Disorders
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2017, Vol. 60, 1545-1550. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-16-0282
History: Received July 7, 2016 , Revised November 4, 2016 , Accepted January 6, 2017
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2017, Vol. 60, 1545-1550. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-16-0282
History: Received July 7, 2016; Revised November 4, 2016; Accepted January 6, 2017

Purpose The vocal auditory-motor control of individuals with hyperfunctional voice disorders was examined using a sensorimotor adaptation paradigm.

Method Nine individuals with hyperfunctional voice disorders and 9 individuals with typical voices produced sustained vowels over 160 trials in 2 separate conditions: (a) while experiencing gradual upward perturbations in the fundamental frequency (fo) of their auditory feedback (shift-up) and (b) under no auditory perturbation (control). The shift-up condition consisted of 4 ordered (fixed) phases: baseline (no perturbation), ramp (gradual increases in heard fo), hold (a consistently higher heard fo), and after-effect (no perturbation). Adaptive responses were defined as the difference in produced fo during control and shift-up conditions.

Results Adaptive responses were significantly different between groups. Individuals with typical voices generally showed compensatory adaptive responses, with decreased fo during the ramp and hold phases. Conversely, many individuals with hyperfunctional voice disorders instead displayed the opposite effect by following the direction of the perturbation. When fo was experimentally increased, speakers further increased their fo.

Conclusion Results indicate that some individuals diagnosed with hyperfunctional voice disorders have disrupted auditory-motor control, suggesting atypical neurological function. These findings may eventually allow for the development of new interventions for hyperfunctional voice disorders.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by National Institutes of Health Grants DC015570 and DC004663 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. We thank T. Streeter for assistance with equipment calibration, F. H. Guenther for helpful discussions, and R. E. Hillman, J. Van Stan, J. T. Baxter, V. S. McKenna, and V. Ramsumair for patient referrals.
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