Gauging the Auditory Dimensions of Dysarthric Impairment: Reliability and Construct Validity of the Bogenhausen Dysarthria Scales (BoDyS) Purpose Standardized clinical assessment of dysarthria is essential for management and research. We present a new, fully standardized dysarthria assessment, the Bogenhausen Dysarthria Scales (BoDyS). The measurement model of the BoDyS is based on auditory evaluations of connected speech using 9 scales (traits) assessed by 4 elicitation methods. Analyses of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 10, 2017
Gauging the Auditory Dimensions of Dysarthric Impairment: Reliability and Construct Validity of the Bogenhausen Dysarthria Scales (BoDyS)
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Wolfram Ziegler
    Clinical Neuropsychology Research Group, Institute of Phonetics and Speech Processing, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Munich, Germany
  • Anja Staiger
    Clinical Neuropsychology Research Group, Institute of Phonetics and Speech Processing, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Munich, Germany
  • Theresa Schölderle
    Clinical Neuropsychology Research Group, Institute of Phonetics and Speech Processing, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Munich, Germany
  • Mathias Vogel
    Clinic for Neurology, Neurophysiology, Neuropsychology, and Stroke Unit, Clinic Bogenhausen, City Hospital Munich, Germany
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Wolfram Ziegler: wolfram.ziegler@ekn-muenchen.de
  • Editor: Julie Liss
    Editor: Julie Liss×
  • Associate Editor: Tanya Eadie
    Associate Editor: Tanya Eadie×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Dysarthria / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 10, 2017
Gauging the Auditory Dimensions of Dysarthric Impairment: Reliability and Construct Validity of the Bogenhausen Dysarthria Scales (BoDyS)
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2017, Vol. 60, 1516-1534. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-16-0336
History: Received August 23, 2016 , Revised December 8, 2016 , Accepted January 28, 2017
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2017, Vol. 60, 1516-1534. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-16-0336
History: Received August 23, 2016; Revised December 8, 2016; Accepted January 28, 2017

Purpose Standardized clinical assessment of dysarthria is essential for management and research. We present a new, fully standardized dysarthria assessment, the Bogenhausen Dysarthria Scales (BoDyS). The measurement model of the BoDyS is based on auditory evaluations of connected speech using 9 scales (traits) assessed by 4 elicitation methods. Analyses of the BoDyS' reliability and construct validity were performed to test this model, with the aim of gauging the auditory dimensions of speech impairment in dysarthria.

Method Interrater agreement was examined in 70 persons with dysarthria. Construct validity was examined in 190 persons with dysarthria using a multitrait-multimethod design with confirmatory factor analysis.

Results Interrater agreement of < 1 on a 5-point scale was found in 91% of cases across listener pairs and scales. Average reliability was .85. Inspection of the multitrait-multimethod matrix pointed at a high convergent and discriminant validity. Modeling of the BoDyS trait and method factors using confirmatory factor analysis yielded high goodness of fit. Model coefficients confirmed high discriminant and convergent validity and revealed meaningful relationships between scales and methods.

Conclusions The 9 auditory scales of the BoDyS provide a reliable and valid profile of dysarthric impairment. They permit standardized measurement of clinically relevant dimensions of dysarthric speech.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by German Research Association Grants ZI469/10-1/10-2/10-3 and ZI469/15-1/15-2 (awarded to Wolfram Ziegler), and by a scholarship of the German Academic Scholarship Foundation (to Theresa Schölderle). We are grateful to ReHa-Hilfe for continuous support, and to the many institutions, clinicians, and students who contributed to this work. We also wish to thank the individuals with dysarthria who participated in the BoDyS projects.
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