Auditory Processing of Older Adults With Probable Mild Cognitive Impairment Purpose Studies suggest that deficits in auditory processing predict cognitive decline and dementia, but those studies included limited measures of auditory processing. The purpose of this study was to compare older adults with and without probable mild cognitive impairment (MCI) across two domains of auditory processing (auditory performance in competing ... Research Article
Research Article  |   May 24, 2017
Auditory Processing of Older Adults With Probable Mild Cognitive Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jerri D. Edwards
    School of Aging Studies, University of South Florida, Tampa
  • Jennifer J. Lister
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of South Florida, Tampa
  • Maya N. Elias
    School of Aging Studies, University of South Florida, Tampa
  • Amber M. Tetlow
    School of Aging Studies, University of South Florida, Tampa
  • Angela L. Sardina
    School of Aging Studies, University of South Florida, Tampa
  • Nasreen A. Sadeq
    School of Aging Studies, University of South Florida, Tampa
  • Amanda D. Brandino
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of South Florida, Tampa
  • Aryn L. Harrison Bush
    School of Aging Studies, University of South Florida, Tampa
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Jerri D. Edwards: jedwards1@usf.edu
  • Editor: Nancy Tye-Murray
    Editor: Nancy Tye-Murray×
  • Associate Editor: Kathleen Cienkowski
    Associate Editor: Kathleen Cienkowski×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   May 24, 2017
Auditory Processing of Older Adults With Probable Mild Cognitive Impairment
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, May 2017, Vol. 60, 1427-1435. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-H-16-0066
History: Received February 15, 2016 , Revised June 1, 2016 , Accepted October 28, 2016
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, May 2017, Vol. 60, 1427-1435. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-H-16-0066
History: Received February 15, 2016; Revised June 1, 2016; Accepted October 28, 2016

Purpose Studies suggest that deficits in auditory processing predict cognitive decline and dementia, but those studies included limited measures of auditory processing. The purpose of this study was to compare older adults with and without probable mild cognitive impairment (MCI) across two domains of auditory processing (auditory performance in competing acoustic signals and temporal aspects of audition).

Method The Montreal Cognitive Assessment (Nasreddine et al., 2005) was used to classify participants as with or without probable MCI. In this cross-sectional study, participants (n = 79) completed 4 measures of auditory processing: Synthetic Sentence Identification with Ipsilateral Competing Message (Gates, Beiser, Rees, D'Agostino, & Wolf, 2002), Dichotic Sentence Identification (Fifer, Jerger, Berlin, Tobey, & Campbell, 1983), Adaptive Tests of Temporal Resolution (ATTR; Lister & Roberts, 2006; across-channel and within-channel subtests), and time-compressed speech (Wilson, 1993; Wilson, Preece, Salamon, Sperry, & Bornstein, 1994). Audiometry was also conducted.

Results Those with probable MCI had significantly poorer performance than those without MCI on Synthetic Sentence Identification with Ipsilateral Competing Message, Dichotic Sentence Identification, and the ATTR within-channel subtest. No group differences were found for time-compressed speech, ATTR across-channel, or audiometric measures.

Conclusions Older adults with cognitive impairment not only have difficulty with competing acoustic signals but may also show poor temporal processing. The profile of auditory processing deficits among older adults with cognitive impairment may include multiple domains.

Acknowledgments
We acknowledge the investigators and research team in the Cognitive Aging Lab within the School of Aging Studies and the Neurophysiology of Aging Lab within the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of South Florida in Tampa.
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