Apoptosis and Vocal Fold Disease: Clinically Relevant Implications of Epithelial Cell Death Purpose Vocal fold diseases affecting the epithelium have a detrimental impact on vocal function. This review article provides an overview of apoptosis, the most commonly studied type of programmed cell death. Because apoptosis can damage epithelial cells, this article examines the implications of apoptosis on diseases affecting the vocal fold ... Review Article
Review Article  |   May 24, 2017
Apoptosis and Vocal Fold Disease: Clinically Relevant Implications of Epithelial Cell Death
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Carolyn K. Novaleski
    Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences, School of Medicine, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
  • Bruce D. Carter
    Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
  • M. Preeti Sivasankar
    Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Sheila H. Ridner
    Department of Nursing Science, School of Nursing, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
  • Mary S. Dietrich
    Department of Nursing Science, School of Nursing, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
  • Bernard Rousseau
    Department of Otolaryngology, Hearing and Speech Sciences, and Mechanical Engineering, School of Medicine, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Carolyn K. Novaleski, who is now at the Monell Chemical Senses Center: cnovaleski@monell.org
  • Editor: Julie Liss
    Editor: Julie Liss×
  • Associate Editor: Jack Jiang
    Associate Editor: Jack Jiang×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Review Articles
Review Article   |   May 24, 2017
Apoptosis and Vocal Fold Disease: Clinically Relevant Implications of Epithelial Cell Death
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, May 2017, Vol. 60, 1264-1272. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-S-16-0326
History: Received August 11, 2016 , Revised October 31, 2016 , Accepted November 22, 2016
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, May 2017, Vol. 60, 1264-1272. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-S-16-0326
History: Received August 11, 2016; Revised October 31, 2016; Accepted November 22, 2016

Purpose Vocal fold diseases affecting the epithelium have a detrimental impact on vocal function. This review article provides an overview of apoptosis, the most commonly studied type of programmed cell death. Because apoptosis can damage epithelial cells, this article examines the implications of apoptosis on diseases affecting the vocal fold cover.

Method A review of the extant literature was performed. We summarized the topics of epithelial tissue properties and apoptotic cell death, described what is currently understood about apoptosis in the vocal fold, and proposed several possible explanations for how the role of abnormal apoptosis during wound healing may be involved in vocal pathology.

Results and Conclusions Apoptosis plays an important role in maintaining normal epithelial tissue function. The biological mechanisms responsible for vocal fold diseases of epithelial origin are only beginning to emerge. This article discusses speculations to explain the potential role of deficient versus excessive rates of apoptosis and how disorganized apoptosis may contribute to the development of common diseases of the vocal folds.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders of the National Institutes of Health under Awards F31DC014621 and R01DC011338. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health. The authors particularly acknowledge Stephen M. Camarata for his support in the development of this manuscript and Stephanie E. Higgs for her writing consultation.
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