Randomized Controlled Trial in Clinical Settings to Evaluate Effectiveness of Coping Skills Education Used With Progressive Tinnitus Management Purpose This randomized controlled trial evaluated, within clinical settings, the effectiveness of coping skills education that is provided with progressive tinnitus management (PTM). Method At 2 Veterans Affairs medical centers, N = 300 veterans were randomized to either PTM intervention or 6-month wait-list control. The PTM intervention involved ... Research Article
Newly Published
Research Article  |   April 17, 2017
Randomized Controlled Trial in Clinical Settings to Evaluate Effectiveness of Coping Skills Education Used With Progressive Tinnitus Management
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • James A. Henry
    Veterans Affairs Rehabilitation Research and Development National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research, Veterans Affairs Portland Health Care System, OR
    Department of Otolaryngology – Head & Neck Surgery, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland
  • Emily J. Thielman
    Veterans Affairs Rehabilitation Research and Development National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research, Veterans Affairs Portland Health Care System, OR
  • Tara L. Zaugg
    Veterans Affairs Rehabilitation Research and Development National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research, Veterans Affairs Portland Health Care System, OR
  • Christine Kaelin
    Veterans Affairs Rehabilitation Research and Development National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research, Veterans Affairs Portland Health Care System, OR
  • Caroline J. Schmidt
    Psychology Service and Audiology Service, Veterans Affairs Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven
    Department of Psychiatry, Yale University, New Haven, CT
  • Susan Griest
    Veterans Affairs Rehabilitation Research and Development National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research, Veterans Affairs Portland Health Care System, OR
    Department of Otolaryngology – Head & Neck Surgery, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland
  • Garnett P. McMillan
    Veterans Affairs Rehabilitation Research and Development National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research, Veterans Affairs Portland Health Care System, OR
  • Paula Myers
    Department of Audiology, James A. Haley Veterans Hospital, Tampa, FL
  • Izel Rivera
    Harry S. Truman Memorial Veterans' Hospital, Columbia, MO
  • Robert Baldwin
    Memphis Veterans Affairs Medical Center, TN
  • Kathleen Carlson
    Veterans Affairs Rehabilitation Research and Development National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research, Veterans Affairs Portland Health Care System, OR
    Veterans Affairs Health Services Research and Development Center of Innovation, Veterans Affairs Portland Health Care System, OR
    School of Public Health, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to James A. Henry: james.henry@va.gov
  • Editor: Nancy Tye-Murray
    Editor: Nancy Tye-Murray×
  • Associate Editor: Kathleen Cienkowski
    Associate Editor: Kathleen Cienkowski×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Newly Published / Research Article
Research Article   |   April 17, 2017
Randomized Controlled Trial in Clinical Settings to Evaluate Effectiveness of Coping Skills Education Used With Progressive Tinnitus Management
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-H-16-0126
History: Received March 30, 2016 , Revised August 12, 2016 , Accepted October 7, 2016
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-H-16-0126
History: Received March 30, 2016; Revised August 12, 2016; Accepted October 7, 2016

Purpose This randomized controlled trial evaluated, within clinical settings, the effectiveness of coping skills education that is provided with progressive tinnitus management (PTM).

Method At 2 Veterans Affairs medical centers, N = 300 veterans were randomized to either PTM intervention or 6-month wait-list control. The PTM intervention involved 5 group workshops: 2 led by an audiologist (teaching how to use sound as therapy) and 3 by a psychologist (teaching coping skills derived from cognitive behavioral therapy). It was hypothesized that PTM would be more effective than wait-list control in reducing functional effects of tinnitus and that there would be no differences in effectiveness between sites.

Results At both sites, a statistically significant improvement in mean Tinnitus Functional Index scores was seen at 6 months for the PTM group. Combined data across sites revealed a statistically significant improvement in Tinnitus Functional Index relative to wait-list control. The effect size for PTM using the Tinnitus Functional Index was 0.36 (small).

Conclusions Results suggest that PTM is effective at reducing tinnitus-related functional distress in clinical settings. Although effect sizes were small, they provide evidence of clinical effectiveness of PTM in the absence of stringent research-related inclusion criteria and with a relatively small number of sessions of cognitive behavioral therapy.

Acknowledgments
Funding was provided by grants awarded to J.A. Henry from VA Rehabilitation Research & Development Service (Grants C7213R and C9247S) with general support from the Veterans Health Administration. This study involved investigators and staff at multiple sites whom we gratefully acknowledge for their efforts and contributions: (a) Memphis VAMC: Michelle Grimes, Allison Jones, and Janet Wood; (b) VA Connecticut Healthcare System: Cyndi Trueheart, Suzanne Finkel, and Johnna Gonzalez. We acknowledge the important contributions of Marcia Legro for assistance in qualitative analyses.
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