Speech Inconsistency in Children With Childhood Apraxia of Speech, Language Impairment, and Speech Delay: Depends on the Stimuli Purpose The current research sought to determine (a) if speech inconsistency is a core feature of childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) or if it is driven by comorbid language impairment that affects a large subset of children with CAS and (b) if speech inconsistency is a sensitive and specific diagnostic ... Research Article
Research Article  |   May 24, 2017
Speech Inconsistency in Children With Childhood Apraxia of Speech, Language Impairment, and Speech Delay: Depends on the Stimuli
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jenya Iuzzini-Seigel
    Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI
  • Tiffany P. Hogan
    MGH Institute of Health Professions, Boston, MA
  • Jordan R. Green
    MGH Institute of Health Professions, Boston, MA
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Jordan R. Green: jgreen2@mghihp.edu
  • Editor and Associate Editor: Ben A. M. Maassen
    Editor and Associate Editor: Ben A. M. Maassen×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Apraxia of Speech & Childhood Apraxia of Speech / Language Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   May 24, 2017
Speech Inconsistency in Children With Childhood Apraxia of Speech, Language Impairment, and Speech Delay: Depends on the Stimuli
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, May 2017, Vol. 60, 1194-1210. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-S-15-0184
History: Received May 19, 2015 , Revised March 16, 2016 , Accepted October 20, 2016
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, May 2017, Vol. 60, 1194-1210. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-S-15-0184
History: Received May 19, 2015; Revised March 16, 2016; Accepted October 20, 2016

Purpose The current research sought to determine (a) if speech inconsistency is a core feature of childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) or if it is driven by comorbid language impairment that affects a large subset of children with CAS and (b) if speech inconsistency is a sensitive and specific diagnostic marker that can differentiate between CAS and speech delay.

Method Participants included 48 children ranging between 4;7 to 17;8 (years;months) with CAS (n = 10), CAS + language impairment (n = 10), speech delay (n = 10), language impairment (n = 9), or typical development (n = 9). Speech inconsistency was assessed at phonemic and token-to-token levels using a variety of stimuli.

Results Children with CAS and CAS + language impairment performed equivalently on all inconsistency assessments. Children with language impairment evidenced high levels of speech inconsistency on the phrase “buy Bobby a puppy.” Token-to-token inconsistency of monosyllabic words and the phrase “buy Bobby a puppy” was sensitive and specific in differentiating children with CAS and speech delay, whereas inconsistency calculated on other stimuli (e.g., multisyllabic words) was less efficacious in differentiating between these disorders.

Conclusions Speech inconsistency is a core feature of CAS and is efficacious in differentiating between children with CAS and speech delay; however, sensitivity and specificity are stimuli dependent.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by the University of Nebraska Health Research Consortium (co–principal investigators: Hogan and Green), and the Childhood Apraxia of Speech Association of North America (principal investigator: Iuzzini). The authors wish to thank the following individuals: Kimber Green, Sara Benham, Panying Rong, Dyann Rupp, Tacy Corson, Phoebe Chung, Natalie Vanderveen, Ashley Africa, and Kristin Schneller. Portions of these data were presented at the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association's annual convention (Iuzzini, Hogan, & Green, 2014).
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access