Normative Study of Wideband Acoustic Immittance Measures in Newborn Infants Objective The purpose of this study was to describe normative aspects of wideband acoustic immittance (WAI) measures obtained from healthy White neonates. Method In this cross-sectional study, wideband absorbance (WBA), admittance magnitude, and admittance phase were measured under ambient pressure condition in 326 ears from 203 neonates (M ... Research Article
Research Article  |   May 24, 2017
Normative Study of Wideband Acoustic Immittance Measures in Newborn Infants
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sreedevi Aithal
    Department of Audiology, The Townsville Hospital, Queensland, Australia
  • Joseph Kei
    Hearing Research Unit for Children, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
  • Venkatesh Aithal
    Department of Audiology, The Townsville Hospital, Queensland, Australia
    Hearing Research Unit for Children, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
  • Alehandrea Manuel
    Department of Audiology, The Townsville Hospital, Queensland, Australia
    Hearing Research Unit for Children, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
  • Joshua Myers
    Department of Audiology, The Townsville Hospital, Queensland, Australia
    Hearing Research Unit for Children, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
  • Carlie Driscoll
    Hearing Research Unit for Children, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
  • Asaduzzaman Khan
    Hearing Research Unit for Children, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Sreedevi Aithal: Sreedevi.aithal@health.qld.gov.au
  • Editor: Nancy Tye-Murray
    Editor: Nancy Tye-Murray×
  • Associate Editor: Todd Ricketts
    Associate Editor: Todd Ricketts×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Hearing Disorders / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   May 24, 2017
Normative Study of Wideband Acoustic Immittance Measures in Newborn Infants
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, May 2017, Vol. 60, 1417-1426. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-H-16-0237
History: Received June 15, 2016 , Revised August 11, 2016 , Accepted October 20, 2016
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, May 2017, Vol. 60, 1417-1426. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-H-16-0237
History: Received June 15, 2016; Revised August 11, 2016; Accepted October 20, 2016

Objective The purpose of this study was to describe normative aspects of wideband acoustic immittance (WAI) measures obtained from healthy White neonates.

Method In this cross-sectional study, wideband absorbance (WBA), admittance magnitude, and admittance phase were measured under ambient pressure condition in 326 ears from 203 neonates (M age = 45.9 hr) who passed a battery of tests, including automated auditory brainstem response, high-frequency tympanometry, and distortion product otoacoustic emissions.

Results Normative WBA data were in agreement with most previous studies. Normative data for both WBA and admittance magnitude revealed double-peaked patterns with the 1st peak at 1.25–2 kHz and the 2nd peak at 5–8 kHz, while normative admittance phase data showed 2 peaks at 0.8 and 4 kHz. There were no significant differences between ears or gender for the 3 WAI measures. Standard deviations for all 3 measures were highest at frequencies above 4 kHz.

Conclusions The 3 WAI measures between 1 kHz and 4 kHz may provide the most stable response of the outer and middle ear. WAI measures at frequencies above 4 kHz were more variable. The normative data established in the present study may serve as a reference for evaluating outer and middle ear function in neonates.

Acknowledgments
This study was supported by a National Health and Medical Research Council Project Grant APP1046477 awarded to Joseph Kei. The authors thank the Institute of Surgery for supporting the research, the Institute of Women's and Children's Services and Healthy Hearing for support in recruiting neonates for the study, and Karen Nielsen for help with administrative duties. The authors acknowledge an equipment loan from Interacoustics A/S (Denmark).
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