Processing of Acoustic Cues in Lexical-Tone Identification by Pediatric Cochlear-Implant Recipients Purpose The objective was to investigate acoustic cue processing in lexical-tone recognition by pediatric cochlear-implant (CI) recipients who are native Mandarin speakers. Method Lexical-tone recognition was assessed in pediatric CI recipients and listeners with normal hearing (NH) in 2 tasks. In Task 1, participants identified naturally uttered words ... Research Article
Research Article  |   May 24, 2017
Processing of Acoustic Cues in Lexical-Tone Identification by Pediatric Cochlear-Implant Recipients
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Shu-Chen Peng
    Center for Devices and Radiological Health, United States Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, MD
  • Hui-Ping Lu
    Chi-Mei Medical Center, Tainan, Taiwan
  • Nelson Lu
    Center for Devices and Radiological Health, United States Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, MD
  • Yung-Song Lin
    Chi-Mei Medical Center, Tainan, Taiwan
    Taipei Medical University, Taiwan
  • Mickael L. D. Deroche
    McGill University, Montréal, Québec, Canada
  • Monita Chatterjee
    Boys Town National Research Hospital, Omaha, NE
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Monita Chatterjee: monita.chatterjee@boystown.org
  • Editor: Julie Liss
    Editor: Julie Liss×
  • Associate Editor: Megan McAuliffe
    Associate Editor: Megan McAuliffe×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   May 24, 2017
Processing of Acoustic Cues in Lexical-Tone Identification by Pediatric Cochlear-Implant Recipients
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, May 2017, Vol. 60, 1223-1235. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-S-16-0048
History: Received February 5, 2016 , Revised July 19, 2016 , Accepted October 27, 2016
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, May 2017, Vol. 60, 1223-1235. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-S-16-0048
History: Received February 5, 2016; Revised July 19, 2016; Accepted October 27, 2016

Purpose The objective was to investigate acoustic cue processing in lexical-tone recognition by pediatric cochlear-implant (CI) recipients who are native Mandarin speakers.

Method Lexical-tone recognition was assessed in pediatric CI recipients and listeners with normal hearing (NH) in 2 tasks. In Task 1, participants identified naturally uttered words that were contrastive in lexical tones. For Task 2, a disyllabic word (yanjing) was manipulated orthogonally, varying in fundamental-frequency (F0) contours and duration patterns. Participants identified each token with the second syllable jing pronounced with Tone 1 (a high level tone) as eyes or with Tone 4 (a high falling tone) as eyeglasses.

Results CI participants' recognition accuracy was significantly lower than NH listeners' in Task 1. In Task 2, CI participants' reliance on F0 contours was significantly less than that of NH listeners; their reliance on duration patterns, however, was significantly higher than that of NH listeners. Both CI and NH listeners' performance in Task 1 was significantly correlated with their reliance on F0 contours in Task 2.

Conclusion For pediatric CI recipients, lexical-tone recognition using naturally uttered words is primarily related to their reliance on F0 contours, although duration patterns may be used as an additional cue.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by National Institutes of Health Grants R01 DC004786-08S1, R21 DC011905, and R01 DC014233 (awarded to Monita Chatterjee) and Chi-Mei Research Foundation and Taiwan National Science Council Grant 100-2314-B-038-037 (awarded to Yung-Song Lin). We are grateful to the research participants for their support of this work.
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