Lingual–Alveolar Contact Pressure During Speech in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: Preliminary Findings Purpose This preliminary study on lingual–alveolar contact pressures (LACP) in people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) had several aims: (a) to evaluate whether the protocol induced fatigue, (b) to compare LACP during speech (LACP-Sp) and during maximum isometric pressing (LACP-Max) in people with ALS (PALS) versus healthy controls, (c) to ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 14, 2017
Lingual–Alveolar Contact Pressure During Speech in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: Preliminary Findings
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jeff Searl
    Hearing and Speech Department, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City
  • Stephanie Knollhoff
    Hearing and Speech Department, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City
  • Richard J. Barohn
    Department of Neurology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Jeff Searl: jsearl@kumc.edu
  • Editor: Julie Liss
    Editor: Julie Liss×
  • Associate Editor: Jordan Green
    Associate Editor: Jordan Green×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Special Populations / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 14, 2017
Lingual–Alveolar Contact Pressure During Speech in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: Preliminary Findings
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2017, Vol. 60, 810-825. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-S-16-0107
History: Received March 17, 2016 , Revised August 4, 2016 , Accepted October 2, 2016
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2017, Vol. 60, 810-825. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-S-16-0107
History: Received March 17, 2016; Revised August 4, 2016; Accepted October 2, 2016
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose This preliminary study on lingual–alveolar contact pressures (LACP) in people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) had several aims: (a) to evaluate whether the protocol induced fatigue, (b) to compare LACP during speech (LACP-Sp) and during maximum isometric pressing (LACP-Max) in people with ALS (PALS) versus healthy controls, (c) to compare the percentage of LACP-Max utilized during speech (%Max) for PALS versus controls, and (d) to evaluate relationships between LACP-Sp and LACP-Max with word intelligibility.

Method Thirteen PALS and 12 healthy volunteers produced /t, d, s, z, l, n/ sounds while LACP-Sp was recorded. LACP-Max was obtained before and after the speech protocol. Word intelligibility was obtained from auditory–perceptual judgments.

Results LACP-Max values measured before and after completion of the speech protocol did not differ. LACP-Sp and LACP-Max were statistically lower in the ALS bulbar group compared with controls and PALS with only spinal symptoms. There was no statistical difference between groups for %Max. LACP-Sp and LACP-Max were correlated with word intelligibility.

Conclusions It was feasible to obtain LACP-Sp measures without inducing fatigue. Reductions in LACP-Sp and LACP-Max for bulbar speakers might reflect tongue weakness. Although confirmation of results is needed, the data indicate that individuals with high word intelligibility maintained LACP-Sp at or above 2 kPa and LACP-Max at or above 50 kPa.

Acknowledgment
This work was supported by a Clinical and Translational Science Award grant from National Center for Advancing Translational Science (NCATS) awarded to the University of Kansas Medical Center for Frontiers: The Heartland Institute for Clinical and Translational Research UL1TR000001 (formerly UL1RR033179). The contents of this article are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health or NCATS.
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