Motor Speech Phenotypes of Frontotemporal Dementia, Primary Progressive Aphasia, and Progressive Apraxia of Speech Purpose Our purpose was to create a comprehensive review of speech impairment in frontotemporal dementia (FTD), primary progressive aphasia (PPA), and progressive apraxia of speech in order to identify the most effective measures for diagnosis and monitoring, and to elucidate associations between speech and neuroimaging. Method Speech and ... Review Article
Review Article  |   April 14, 2017
Motor Speech Phenotypes of Frontotemporal Dementia, Primary Progressive Aphasia, and Progressive Apraxia of Speech
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Matthew L. Poole
    Centre for Neuroscience of Speech, The University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
    Eastern Cognitive Disorders Clinic, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  • Amy Brodtmann
    Eastern Cognitive Disorders Clinic, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
    Florey Institute for Neuroscience and Mental Health, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  • David Darby
    Eastern Cognitive Disorders Clinic, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
    Florey Institute for Neuroscience and Mental Health, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  • Adam P. Vogel
    Centre for Neuroscience of Speech, The University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
    Eastern Cognitive Disorders Clinic, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
    Department of Neurodegeneration, Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research, University of Tübingen, Germany
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. Amy Brodtmann and Adam P. Vogel hold National Health and Medical Research Council Career Development Fellowships (IDs 1082910 and 1045617, respectively).
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. Amy Brodtmann and Adam P. Vogel hold National Health and Medical Research Council Career Development Fellowships (IDs 1082910 and 1045617, respectively). ×
  • Correspondence to Adam P. Vogel: vogela@unimelb.edu.au
  • Editor and Associate Editor: Julie Liss
    Editor and Associate Editor: Julie Liss×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Apraxia of Speech & Childhood Apraxia of Speech / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Older Adults & Aging / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Review Article
Review Article   |   April 14, 2017
Motor Speech Phenotypes of Frontotemporal Dementia, Primary Progressive Aphasia, and Progressive Apraxia of Speech
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2017, Vol. 60, 897-911. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-S-16-0140
History: Received April 8, 2016 , Revised July 20, 2016 , Accepted September 11, 2016
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2017, Vol. 60, 897-911. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-S-16-0140
History: Received April 8, 2016; Revised July 20, 2016; Accepted September 11, 2016
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose Our purpose was to create a comprehensive review of speech impairment in frontotemporal dementia (FTD), primary progressive aphasia (PPA), and progressive apraxia of speech in order to identify the most effective measures for diagnosis and monitoring, and to elucidate associations between speech and neuroimaging.

Method Speech and neuroimaging data described in studies of FTD and PPA were systematically reviewed. A meta-analysis was conducted for speech measures that were used consistently in multiple studies.

Results The methods and nomenclature used to describe speech in these disorders varied between studies. Our meta-analysis identified 3 speech measures which differentiate variants or healthy control-group participants (e.g., nonfluent and logopenic variants of PPA from all other groups, behavioral-variant FTD from a control group). Deficits within the frontal-lobe speech networks are linked to motor speech profiles of the nonfluent variant of PPA and progressive apraxia of speech. Motor speech impairment is rarely reported in semantic and logopenic variants of PPA. Limited data are available on motor speech impairment in the behavioral variant of FTD.

Conclusions Our review identified several measures of speech which may assist with diagnosis and classification, and consolidated the brain–behavior associations relating to speech in FTD, PPA, and progressive apraxia of speech.

Acknowledgments
We would like to note the following roles each author had in contributing to this article: Matthew L. Poole designed the study, analyzed and interpreted the data, and drafted the manuscript; Amy Brodtmann interpreted the data and revised the manuscript; David Darby interpreted the data and revised the manuscript; and Adam P. Vogel designed and conceptualized the study, analyzed and interpreted the data, and revised the manuscript. Matthew L. Poole would like to acknowledge the postgraduate scholarship support from the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia.
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