Increased Response to Altered Auditory Feedback in Dyslexia: A Weaker Sensorimotor Magnet Implied in the Phonological Deficit Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine whether developmental dyslexia (DD) is characterized by deficiencies in speech sensory and motor feedforward and feedback mechanisms, which are involved in the modulation of phonological representations. Method A total of 42 adult native speakers of Dutch (22 adults with ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 2017
Increased Response to Altered Auditory Feedback in Dyslexia: A Weaker Sensorimotor Magnet Implied in the Phonological Deficit
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mark R. van den Bunt
    Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University, Nijmegen, the Netherlands
  • Margriet A. Groen
    Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University, Nijmegen, the Netherlands
  • Takayuki Ito
    Haskins Laboratories, Yale University, New Haven, CT
    Université Grenoble Alpes, GIPSA-Lab, Grenoble, France
    Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Grenoble Images Parole Signal Automatique (GIPSA) Lab, Grenoble, France
  • Ana A. Francisco
    Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University, Nijmegen, the Netherlands
  • Vincent L. Gracco
    Haskins Laboratories, Yale University, New Haven, CT
    Centre for Research on Brain, Language & Music, McGill University, Montréal, Canada
  • Ken R. Pugh
    Haskins Laboratories, Yale University, New Haven, CT
  • Ludo Verhoeven
    Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University, Nijmegen, the Netherlands
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Mark van den Bunt: m.vandenbunt@pwo.ru.nl
  • Editor: Julie Liss
    Editor: Julie Liss×
  • Associate Editor: Bharath Chandrasekaran
    Associate Editor: Bharath Chandrasekaran×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Hearing & Speech Perception / Language Disorders / Reading & Writing Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 2017
Increased Response to Altered Auditory Feedback in Dyslexia: A Weaker Sensorimotor Magnet Implied in the Phonological Deficit
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 2017, Vol. 60, 654-667. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-L-16-0201
History: Received May 19, 2016 , Revised July 26, 2016 , Accepted September 5, 2016
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 2017, Vol. 60, 654-667. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-L-16-0201
History: Received May 19, 2016; Revised July 26, 2016; Accepted September 5, 2016

Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine whether developmental dyslexia (DD) is characterized by deficiencies in speech sensory and motor feedforward and feedback mechanisms, which are involved in the modulation of phonological representations.

Method A total of 42 adult native speakers of Dutch (22 adults with DD; 20 participants who were typically reading controls) were asked to produce /bep/ while the first formant (F1) of the /e/ was not altered (baseline), increased (ramp), held at maximal perturbation (hold), and not altered again (after-effect). The F1 of the produced utterance was measured for each trial and used for statistical analyses. The measured F1s produced during each phase were entered in a linear mixed-effects model.

Results Participants with DD adapted more strongly during the ramp phase and returned to baseline to a lesser extent when feedback was back to normal (after-effect phase) when compared with the typically reading group. In this study, a faster deviation from baseline during the ramp phase, a stronger adaptation response during the hold phase, and a slower return to baseline during the after-effect phase were associated with poorer reading and phonological abilities.

Conclusion The data of the current study are consistent with the notion that the phonological deficit in DD is associated with a weaker sensorimotor magnet for phonological representations.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by National Institute of Health Grant P01HD 001994 (awarded to Jay Rueckl).
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