Exploring Use of the Coordinate Response Measure in a Multitalker Babble Paradigm Purpose Three experiments examined the use of competing coordinate response measure (CRM) sentences as a multitalker babble. Method In Experiment I, young adults with normal hearing listened to a CRM target sentence in the presence of 2, 4, or 6 competing CRM sentences with synchronous or asynchronous onsets. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 2017
Exploring Use of the Coordinate Response Measure in a Multitalker Babble Paradigm
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Larry E. Humes
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Indiana University Bloomington
  • Gary R. Kidd
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Indiana University Bloomington
  • Daniel Fogerty
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of South Carolina, Columbia
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Larry E. Humes: humes@indiana.edu
  • Editor: Nancy Tye-Murray
    Editor: Nancy Tye-Murray×
  • Associate Editor: Mitchell Sommers
    Associate Editor: Mitchell Sommers×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 2017
Exploring Use of the Coordinate Response Measure in a Multitalker Babble Paradigm
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 2017, Vol. 60, 741-754. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-H-16-0042
History: Received February 3, 2016 , Revised August 18, 2016 , Accepted September 1, 2016
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 2017, Vol. 60, 741-754. doi:10.1044/2016_JSLHR-H-16-0042
History: Received February 3, 2016; Revised August 18, 2016; Accepted September 1, 2016

Purpose Three experiments examined the use of competing coordinate response measure (CRM) sentences as a multitalker babble.

Method In Experiment I, young adults with normal hearing listened to a CRM target sentence in the presence of 2, 4, or 6 competing CRM sentences with synchronous or asynchronous onsets. In Experiment II, the condition with 6 competing sentences was explored further. Three stimulus conditions (6 talkers saying same sentence, 1 talker producing 6 different sentences, and 6 talkers each saying a different sentence) were evaluated with different methods of presentation. Experiment III examined the performance of older adults with hearing impairment in a subset of conditions from Experiment II.

Results In Experiment I, performance declined with increasing numbers of talkers and improved with asynchronous sentence onsets. Experiment II identified conditions under which an increase in the number of talkers led to better performance. In Experiment III, the relative effects of the number of talkers, messages, and onset asynchrony were the same for young and older listeners.

Conclusions Multitalker babble composed of CRM sentences has masking properties similar to other types of multitalker babble. However, when the number of different talkers and messages are varied independently, performance is best with more talkers and fewer messages.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported, in part, by a research grant (R01 AG008293) from the National Institute on Aging. The authors thank Kristen Baisley and Kristin Quinones for help with data collection.
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